Topical Blog due Tuesday 2/21 @ midnight

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This week's topical blog will be devoted to your analysis of the movie Good Will Hunting.

This movie has concepts from Chapters 5-7.

Watch the movie. Take notes.

Next, write your comment. Your comment does not need to provide an overview of the movie (we have all seen it). Your comment should be an in-depth analysis of one or more principles from your text. You should use scenes and characters to provide examples of textbook concepts. Your comment should reflect that you are in an upper division, university level Motivation and Emotion course and clearly link elements from the movie to the textbook.  This is a comprehensive assignment (linking course lectures, textbook, and the movie) and you cannot do that in just a few short paragraphs.

BE SPECIFIC. At the bottom of your comment, please put a list of the ME terms you used.

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Good Will Hunting is a movie about an intellectually gifted, yet troubled young man who struggles to find his place in the world. Through the guidance of the people who care about him (including his best friend, lover, and therapist) he eventually comes to terms with his past, so he can use his talents to create a better life. This movie is a perfect example of psychological and social needs, because Will is an extraordinary man living in an ordinary environment, which demonstrates his deficits of these needs.

I chose to concentrate on the break up scene between Will and Skylar, because it demonstrated a lot of the material covered in the book, and it was quite moving. It begins with Skylar asking Will to come to California with her, and Will reacts with doubts about their future (“We might be in California next week, and you might find out something about me you don’t like”). Will says he can’t go to California because he has a life in Boston. Skylar takes it as Will’s way of saying he doesn’t love her, but Will denies this. So, Skylar asks him what he’s scarred of that’s keeping him from leaving his safe environment and taking a risk with her. Will responds angrily that she’s just using him for a fling, and there’s no future with him, because she’s rich and he’s poor. She tells him the money isn’t an issue, and she isn’t the one lying (referencing to Will’s brothers). This hits a nerve in Will, causing him to shout the truth about his childhood (being an orphan and past abuse), in which Skylar tries to reach out to him. However, Will brushes off her attempts and tries to leave. Skylar stops him and says she loves him and wants to help, but she’ll leave him alone if he doesn’t love her back. As she tries to kiss him, Will says he doesn’t love her and leaves. The scene ends with Skylar crying alone.

As in my previous movie review, I’ll examine their behaviors step by step from the scene (rather than the order or terms presented in the book) and expand on them using class material. First, Skylar asks Will to come to California with her, which would be a major step in their relationship. This demonstrates a need for intimacy, because she has developed a caring relationship with Will and wants to increase his willingness to exchange with her. Yet, Will reacts with doubt, so he is not trying to satisfy an intimacy need, but rather avoiding it. A major reinforcer for Will’s behavior comes from a previous experience of being abandoned (orphan) and not being accepted (abuse in orphanages). These previous experiences were aversive punishments, because they decreased Will’s behavior to attach to others by presenting negative things when he did so in the past, which provided him an incentive to not go with Skylar to California (or get too attached to her) to prevent another negative experience. Will’s behavior is also consistent with the trends of individuals who experienced aversive punishment in the past (negative emotion and trouble forming relationships).

Since Skylar’s need for intimacy was not met, she reacts with fear and anger towards Will. She takes a shot at his competence by accusing him of being afraid of leaving his safe haven to take a risk, and that she is scared as well but has better competence, because she is willing to try. Will has achievement and competence issues coming from unsatisfied needs. For instance, he doesn’t have to compete with people at his level, and avoids entrepreneurship, which creates a non-nurturing environment for achievement. Also, he doesn’t seek out a career that would optimally challenge him (creating flow) and has poor failure tolerance, which creates a non-nurturing environment for competence.
This upsets Will, so he says that she isn’t hurt, because she was just using him for a fling (she had an extrinsic motivation to be with him by using him to satisfy her needs), and she belongs in a rich world without him. This was an accusation that Skylar was satisfying a power need (using Will), and she is not hurt in an intimate way (which would make him feel less sympathetic since he was being used). Skylar denies this by saying she is rich from her dad’s death, and the money isn’t as important to her as a relationship (she has an intrinsic motivation to be with him). This line demonstrates the opposition power has with intimacy, because intimacy involves self-sacrifice, which Skylar is willing do for Will. Furthermore, it also demonstrated how power can be increased by sacrificing intimacy. Skylar then retorts that she did nothing wrong, and Will is the one lying to her.

Earlier, Will said he had twelve brothers and three lived with him. However, his friend accidently revealed later that Will lived in a one-room home, exposing Will’s lie to Skylar. When she brings this up, Will reacts by angrily telling her the truth; he was an orphan and he was abused. This reveals an explanation of his issues with intimacy and competence to Skylar, who continues to try to satisfy her intimacy need with Will by telling him she wants to help him. However, Will sees this as a violation of his autonomy. A lot of people (an M.I.T. professor, a therapist, and now his girlfriend) are starting to interfere in his life to get him to do stuff he doesn’t want to do, because they think it would be best for him. However, autonomy is the one thing Will has, because he lives according to his own standards, in spite of the numerous opportunities possible for him, so he is used to a very autonomy-supportive environment. But his perceived choice starts to become less flexible, creating an autonomy-controlling environment, which Will resists (as people tend to do).

In an attempt to regain his autonomy, Will tries to leave but is cornered by Skylar, who is still trying to establish intimacy with him. She recognizes his need for autonomy and says she will leave him alone if he doesn’t love her. This allows Will to regain some autonomy by giving him a choice in the matter (as well as his freedom if he says he doesn’t love her) and is accepting of a negative response. Although Will is allowed some autonomy, his avoidant behavior with intimacy and competence is still powerful, which leads him to tell Skylar he doesn’t love her and leave. Although we later learn Will had a need for intimacy for Skylar, this scene leads us to believe he saw their relationship as more of an affiliation need (relationship with another without the emotional exchange). Skylar reacts to her failed attempt at intimacy by breaking down emotionally.
Overall, this scene demonstrates Will’s needs in conflict with Skylar’s needs. Will has a need for autonomy but has issues with intimacy and competence, which leads him to misinterpret Skylar’s needs for intimacy with needs for power. Furthermore, Will is like an implicit theorist in that he gives little effort, because he doesn’t think it will lead to improvements and doesn’t want to risk his competence. This is shown in his break up with Skylar, as well as little need for power and achievements. I was happy to see that Will ends up working through his issues, and realizes he can have autonomy and intimacy with Skylar if he is willing to test his competence at the end.

Overall, the movie was better than I remembered when I watched it a decade ago. Also, it did a better job demonstrating the material (as well as more material) from the book than Cast Away. I enjoy movies in which the charter has an internal social or psychological struggle, because they relate to issues in the audiences’ lives, but provide a much more interesting plot than real life.

Terms: Psychological needs, social needs, intimacy, avoidance behavior, reinforcer, aversive punishment, competence, achievement, need satisfaction, competition, entrepreneurship, optimal challenge, flow, failure tolerance, nurturing environment, autonomy, autonomy-supportive, autonomy-controlling, perceived choice, intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, power, affiliation, implicit theorist, effort

In the movie Good Will Hunting, there are several motivational concepts that are expressed. Will Hunting is the main character. He is a kid from a poor neighborhood and an orphan. Will is also a mathematical genius but without the proper guidance he has no chance.

Will gets noticed while he completes a math problem on the chalk board outside an upper level math class. I believe that Will is somewhat intrinsically motivated because he chooses to be a janitor at a prestigious technical college. Will also picks up books and reads them and seems to soak up the information quickly.

On the other hand Will is lacking in extrinsic motivation, because of his troubled past he refuses to let anyone in or take a chance and risk failure. This is a part of Atkinson model in the Tendency to Avoid Failure. Will believes that he will fail so he pushed away Skylar his girlfriend and his mentor Gerald Lambeau. The only person who gets Will to open us is his counselor Dr. Sean Maguire, and at the end of the movie he gets Will to admit that the abuse he suffered for years was not his fault.

In terms of the Atkinson model Will’s motive to avoid failure and probability of failure are much higher than his need for achievement and the perceived probability of success. Eventually this changes and Will decides that the risks are worth it and his tendency to avoid failure diminishes. I believe that Will has a high need for competence this is especially shown in the bar scene with the Harvard student. He shows of his knowledge to first of all protect his friend and also because his is fulfilling the need of competence.

Will it seems to me finds that solving a mathematical problem is pleasurable. Therefor I believe he has a high need for competence but a low need for achievement. Finally Will is high in relatedness with his friends especially his best friend Chuckie, but low with his girlfriend. At the beginning we see a strong relationship between Will and his friends and that persists throughout the movie. This is shown at the end of the film by Chuckie who tells Will that it would be an insult to him if he were to still be in ‘Southie’ 20 years later and passes up his chance for a better life. Will shows relatedness by standing up for his friends like in fights and to the student at the bar. He also shows a need for relatedness towards Skylar at first but when he feels that his chance of failure is higher than his chance to succeed than he pulls away from her. Will’s problems stem from his rough childhood and history of abuse and after counseling his realizes this and he decides to take more chances and he can let himself fail and not be afraid.

Terms: Intrinsic Motivation, Extrinsic Motivation, Atkinson’s Model, Need for Achievement, Tendency to avoid failure, Avoidance Tendency’s, Relatedness, Competence

The very first thing I noticed about this movie is that Will solved the first problem because of his intrinsic motivation. There was nothing externally motivating him. He didn’t tell anyone he did it and even left his friends at the bar to go and solve it. He did it because it felt good and he felt the need to finish and solve it. He didn’t show up the next day to receive a prize or take credit for answering. Once he was caught, he left the scene right away. He didn’t want to take credit for the success he had done.
On the same note, there were are few scenes that he was extrinsically motivated and showed a high social need for affiliation. There was the scene where after the bar and he got into it with the guy that went to MIT about the girl. After they left the bar and he got her number, he walked by the guy and showed him the girls number that he got. He wanted some sort of acceptance from his friends and had to show them he was “cool” and could hurt this guy by showing him the number he got, and using the reference to apples like “how do you like them apples?” this could also fit into his psychological need for relatedness. He has a need for social interaction and the need to belong.
Because of his tendency to avoid failure, he has never really gone to school. He learns through reading and teaching himself. In his meeting with the admissions counselor or dean, he puts him down and says things that no one else would ever say to someone in that position. Its like he wants to be told no, that way he won’t have to possibly fail.
I also noticed earlier in the film that his need for intimacy was somewhat low. He told her how he doesn’t really date, but yet wanted to kiss her. Robin Williams character even calls him out on this specific thing while sitting on a bench in the park/ He tells him that he may ask him about love and he can recite a sonnet, but cant tell him what it feels like to wake up to the woman he loves more than he loves himself. He says he may have had sex with a few girls and could tell him who is favorites are, but has no idea what it means to really believe in love. This is a good example and very true about the way Will really feels. I love the scene where Robin William’s calls him out! Nails everything right on the head.
The next time they are in their therapy session, he talks about his date he went on last week and he talks about how perfect she is, but he isn’t going to call her. His reasoning for not being sure if he is going to call her is because then he will realize that she isn’t perfect and he doesn’t want to ruin the idea and image he has of her now. This again is a wonderful example of his avoidance of failure and his low need for intimacy. At the same time, Robin Williams is showing these same needs, he doesn’t want to get remarried, probably for the avoidance of being hurt again, and cant see himself with anyone else ever again, because of his low need for intimacy. Yet, a few sessions later, he talks about how and when he knew that is wife was the one, and he told the story about how he missed a baseball game, but he has not a single regret. His need for intimacy used to be extremely high, now, not so much.
I also think that Will’s (girlfriend) in the film had some intrinsic motivation too. Will was answering a lot of her questions and solving things she had for homework, and she could have just left it at that, but she insisted that she wanted to learn it. She had a high need for competence.
This is a great movie for many examples from these previous chapters. I enjoyed watching it again. I rented it from Family Videos.

The movie Good Will Hunting is a great example of motivation and emotion, as well as many of the concepts that we have learned throughout chapters 5-7, as well as our class lectures. Many of the examples have to do with intrinsic and extrinsic motivation as well as psychological, physical and social needs. The main character (Will) is pretty much an undercover genius. Will is a janitor at the highly prestige school MIT. Will grew up in foster care, and could not afford the best education. As a janitor at MIT, a professor (Lambeu) realizes how gifted Will is, after he found him of course. One day the professor put a very difficult math program on the board. Will then anonymously left the correct answer there. The rest of the movie shows a journey in which Will goes on, and really shows how motivation and emotion come into play.

As Will see the math problem on the board, he just stands there and stares at it, thinking ‘I can figure this out…’ This part of the movie would be related to intrinsic motivation. I believe will is trying to solve this problem because it is a challenge, and he’s in interest of it. He is not receiving anything from doing so (as far as he knows at the time). There are no incentives; such as extra credit in the class, or getting an A for solving it. It’s just something he wants to engage in for his own sake and mind. Even thought Will states and tries to show he is not interested in his amazing intelligence, I think apart of him felt well after figuring out the math problem.
This scene in the movie also shows signs of competence and autonomy. Will knows that he is in control of his life. Like I have already mentioned; he has a choice rather or not he wants to solve the formula. He is in charge of himself and he doesn’t have a professor ratting on him to figure it out. This shows a sign of autonomy, or independence that the students in that particular class don’t have (yet Will will only be experiencing this for a short time). Of course the students don’t have to do the problem, and doesn’t have to pass the class, but they have incentives for doing so, and have consequences for not, and this would be extrinsic motivation. With Will, he isn’t experiencing that. Yet, there was a part of the movie where Will was experiencing extrinsic motivation. Lambeu found Will and jail and offered to bail him out and keep him out of jail if he agrees to participate in therapy and solve math problems.

Competence is another topic that I feel Will is experiencing as well when it comes to this scene of the movie. Once again, even though Will is not a student at the time, or receiving any type of reinforcement for trying to figure out this problem, he himself wants to be competent. He is striving to interact with his surroundings and possibly develop more intelligence (if that’s even possible for him!). This is a sign of psychological need, and knowing that he can figure out an impossible math problem satisfies that need.

Even though I just explained how Will was receiving high autonomy, there are other parts of the movie that are the opposite, and show how will is receiving a lack of autonomy. This just shows how our psychological needs can change so quickly. After the whole ordeal with Will and Professor Lambeu, Will’s autonomy drops. Lambeu was requiring Will to receive treatment and therapy sessions, as well as pushing him to jobs and careers that he did not want at the time. Also, after Will’s unfortunate background growing up in abusive relationships and feeling alone and abandoned he probably felt a lot of autonomy considering he had to take care of himself. Yet, when Lambeu came into the picture he lost some of that.

Affiliation was also a topic that was represented by Will’s character. This was shown at the end of the movie with Skyler. I think that Will had a hard time expressing his affiliation and intimacy because of his background and past. Being an orphan and in many different foster homes, Will started to feel abandoned and thought he could only rely on himself. I think that fear and anxiety came into play in this situation. Maybe Skyler wouldn’t want to see him, or maybe Skyler didn’t want him back. Those were probably things running through his mind during this situation, and the movie in general.

Affiliation was not the only social need that Will attained. Will’s quasi needs are something that are represented as well. I think the movie shows that Will is satisfied in his life right now, yet other people are not. Will see’s his construction job being just fine and satisfying to him; but to Lambeu and his friend Chuck it’s not. They are both pushing him to get farther in his life and make something out of himself with the amazing abilities and talents he possesses. I think they are both trying to encourage Will to feel some achievement and to experience that in his life. During the scene with Will and Chuck at the construction site we can see this. Chuck goes on about how he is going to be mad if he still sees Will working here. Also, the professor is trying to do the same exact thing-get Will to where he deserves academically. As we can see both Chuck and the professor are trying to motivate Will to bigger and better things, so he can feel more achievement.

Terms: Motivation, Emotion, Needs, Social Needs, Physical Needs, Psychological Needs, Intrinsic Motivation, Extrinsic Motivation, Incentives, Competence, Autonomy, Reinforcement, Strive, Affiliation, Achievement

First off - I love this movie! One of my absolute favorites, so I thoroughly enjoyed watching this for class. It surprised me how much of our M&E material I could apply to this movie. Watching it in this sense made me realize why Will Hunting had the behaviors he did. I liked being able to put terminology to it.

One of the very first things we see in the movie is an MIT advanced mathematics class taking place. The professor states that there is a problem in the hall and the person who could solve it would be privileged to do research with him. We see a young man, Will Hunting, as a janitor cleaning the hallways when he stumbles upon this board. The first time walking by he examines the problem and then walks away. A few minutes later we see him solving the math problem. This demonstrated several things to me. He is obviously very intrinsically motivated to solve the problem. This is when a person engages interest and exercises their capacities to seek out and master optimal challenges. Will was doing this for the fun of it. This could also be seen as competence, the need to interact effectively with the environment and exercise skills to seek out challenges. Will wanted to improve his personal development by giving the math problem a shot. Whether it was actually challenging or in fact, very easy, he was completing it to prove to himself that he could do it. I also found it interesting that he chose to be a janitor at MIT - one of the most prestigious schools for advanced mathematics and more. Will could have been a janitor anywhere, especially somewhere closer to home so he wouldn't have to pay so much to commute everyday. This is still another example of why he was intrinsically motivated. It wasn't because of any extrinsic motivators because that involves incentives and consequences from the activity. Will wasn't trying to do it to receive anything from anybody. It was purely a personal goal.

Another really moving part of the movie is the multiple therapy sessions Will has with Sean. The first few sessions were very rough. Sean tries to simply have a conversation about anything and Will constantly tries to change the subject. Of course this is the 5th therapist that Will has seen now because he makes a mockery of their practice and doesn't believe it would actually help him. Back to Sean and Will - the next few times are harder to sit through. Will is stubborn and doesn't say a single word throughout the entire time. Sean just sat there waiting for Will to talk, he couldn't be the first to say something, it needed to be Will. Props to Sean for his patience, that takes a special person. Finally, Will breaks the silence with a joke and from there it sparks conversation and the beginnings of trust between Sean and Will. Again, a couple psychological needs are seen. These show how an organism initiate interactions with the environment and adapts/changes/grows with it. When Will is constantly avoiding questions and sitting there in silence I think it is a form of autonomy. The need to experience self direction and personal endorsement in the initiation and regulation of a behavior. It was his choice and control. Sean knew this and waited for him to make the decision about talking and really getting down to business. It could also be that Will was extrinsically motivated to talk because he knew this had to get reported back to the judge. Will didn't want to go back to jail for the fight. Maybe once he realized that Sean was a no bulls!$# type of person he better try harder to avoid a bad report.

The last point that I wanted to touch on was Will's relationships with several different people throughout the movie. I feel like this is one of the biggest parts that can go in several directions. First, the relationship Will has with his friends. I would rate Will high on relatedness with his friends/brothers because of what he would do for them and vice versa. Relatedness is the need to establish close emotional bonds and attachments with other people (warm, caring relationships). I think to some degree he forms communal relationships with the 3 main friends we see, especially Chuckie. Will fights for Chuckie (physically), they work together with the construction company, they are spending all their free time together at the bars at night, Chuckie picks up Will every morning and brings him coffee,they tell each other the truth on things. That is part of a communal relationship where you take on other people's beliefs, values, and perspectives in conjunction with your own. On the other hand, there is Will's relationship with Skylar. Skylar is a senior at Harvard University and meets Will at at bar on that side of Boston. He ends up getting her number and they start dating. You really start to see that Will cares about her and possibly loves her but won't admit it to anyone for fear of rejection, hurt, and failure. Will constantly has his guard up - for example, he doesn't tell Chuckie when he goes to see her and he won't introduce Skylar to his 12 (foster) brothers. This definitely represents the social need of affiliation and intimacy. Affiliation is the need to establish, maintain, and restore relationship with others mostly to escape negative emotions, such as loneliness. It was very obvious that Will was doing this with Skylar. He was so afraid that she might leave him because that was all anyone had done in his life. He thought that he could only rely on himself so he never allowed anyone to get close to him. He also lacks intimacy. He wants it but again fears that it will only hurt him in the end. Intimacy is a social motive for engaging in warm, close, positive relationships producing positive emotions and holds little threat of rejection. When he is with Skylar is barely lets himself go to completely experience this need. In his eyes he sees their relationship as perfect just the way it is and he doesn't want to learn more about her or himself because it might ruin what is there now. It is not safe to do so. It is also why Will couldn't say "I love you" to Skylar in the break-up scene.

I think Will learned a lot from Sean, Professor Lambeau, and Chuckie. They were all pushing him to become something better than a janitor or construction worker. He had such a gift but didn't want to publicize it for fear of failing in the eyes of his friends, girlfriends, mentors, or colleagues. I think Chuckie is really the one who opens Will's eyes. Chuckie tells Will, "you owe it to me, because I will still be here in 20 years....but you're too much of a pussy to cash in a winning lottery ticket." Will's brain is his winning lottery ticket out of Boston for a better life. This really raises Will's achievement rating. All the sudden he has the desire to do well relative to a standard of excellence whether that means he fails or succeeds. So he takes the big leap and heads to California (we assume to be with Skylar) and to do something great with his genius mind. Achievement becomes greater than fear and he makes the decision to leave town "to see about a girl."

TERMS: intrinsic motivation, competence, extrinsic motivation, psychological needs, autonomy, relatedness, communal relationship, affiliation, social need, intimacy, achievement

The film Good Will Hunting is about Will, who is a janitor at MIT. He seems to be a normal man but unknown to everyone is that fact that he has an IQ of a genius. Will had a rough childhood and as an adult seems to be kind of a loner at the beginning of the movie. It would appear that Will lacks motivation because he doesn’t use is genius abilities to its’ full potential. The moment we fully notice his genius abilities is when he solves the extremely hard math problem that was meant for the MIT students to work on all year.

It seems that Will has a low need for achievement. Because he has not capitalized off of his gift of being a genius. He was also in jail, which gives the perception that he does not care about achieving anything in life if he is okay with being put in jail. He doesn’t have much competition in him because when arguing with Professor Lambeau he explains how easy math and things are for him compared to everyone else. He doesn’t use mastery goals because he doesn’t want to keep developing his skills, so he basically uses his performance goals in showing others his incredible intelligence.

I think Will is intrinsically motivated because without his own motivation he would not take the time to figure out the proofs or math problems in the hallway. Will has a moderate need for competence. He already knows so much that it is hard for him to want to learn more, but I think he is curious on having others see how smart he is. As I stated before Will seems to be somewhat of a loner, but towards the end of the movie is affiliation needs and relatedness needs change. He wants and likes having friendships and having his needs of relatedness met. He also meats Skylar, the girl that changes his life, like in all good love plot stories in movies, who changes his views on intimacy and affiliation. He likes being near her and getting to know her. Will and Skylar get in a fight about her moving to California, during their fight you can see how attached Will has gotten to Skylar and is afraid of being let down.

Before Skylar and his friend Sean, Will seemed to have a very large sense of autonomy. Being a janitor he has a lot of autonomy because he can clean by himself and doesn’t have others working with him. He liked to do things on his own and not develop deep relationships with others. He didn’t like people checking up on his life. The idea of independence was held very high in Will’s mind. It appeared that he didn’t need very many social needs. But like with his relationship with Skylar he gains some relatedness with Professor Lambeau when they are working on math problems together. In that scene they seem to bond and find commonalities in their personalities.

Robin Williams character, Sean, I think really helped Will develop more social needs and develop his talent more. They seem to become good friends and be able to talk more openly to each other at the end of the movie. By Robin Williams character opening up about his wife it helped to teach Will that life with loved ones is more than ‘getting laid and going on dates’. Will changes with Sean’s help.

Overall this movie is a great example of social needs and how they can make a person much happier. It also shows how important it is for people to capitalize on their own gifts and talents to make the world a better place. I highly enjoyed watching this movie and seeing how it connects with what we are learning in class.

Terms: Social needs, intrinsic motivation, motivation, autonomy, competence, relatedness, intimacy, affiliation, mastery goals, performance skills

The film Good Will Hunting reflected the material we learned from class and the text, especially the psychological needs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, as well as social needs. The character Will, demonstrates many avoidant and deficient behaviors that developed from negative past experiences, like being and orphan and being abused. Throughout the movie, with the help of Sean, Skyler, and Chuckie, he receives guidance and positive reinforcement, which will let him pursue the future meant for him. Since Will demonstrates a lot of these features, I will spend most of this assessment discussing evidence of each.
First I will discuss Will’s problematic childhood so we can further understand his present behavior. During the movie, it comes out that Will was an orphan and suffered from child abuse. His caretakers were using ineffective punishment strategy, like physical abuse. Given that, Will developed side effects such as negative emotionality, impaired relationship skills, and negative modeling. His negative emotions are mainly displayed by fear, anxiety, and aggression towards interpersonal relationships. His impaired relationship skills are made clear with his relationship with Skyler and Sean. And the negative modeling is portrayed through his violence and several assault cases.
The opening scene of the movie, where Will writes mathematical equations on the chalk board, introduces his intrinsic motivation. This brilliant mind would rather work construction and custodial work than go through with his interest for math. It also shows that Will does not perceive money as an external motivator, or incentive. This is also apparent later in the film when Professor Lambeau sets up meetings with prestigious companies and Will turns them down. This situation is also an example of hidden costs of rewards. Since Prof. Lambeau imposes himself onto Will’s life and makes him pursue this talent, the extrinsic factor of money or prestige undermines his enjoyment in his talent, and example of unintended primary effect.
Since Will had a troubled childhood and extreme cases of disattachment, he developed an avoidant or deficient social need of affiliation or intimacy. Affiliation is rooted in the fear of interpersonal reject, so instead of searching for relationships, he avoids them and pushes people away who get too intimately close. Will has a disoriented view of affiliation and intimacy. He was never able to experience the approval, acceptance, and security in interpersonal relationships. For example, in the scene where Skyler invites Will to come to California they get into a fight and break up. Skyler was trying to satisfy her need for intimacy by taking their relationship a step further, but Will could not believe that it’s what she truly wanted, and that she’ll discover things about him and dump him. He tells her the truth about his childhood and even though she says it’s okay because she loves him, Will cannot believe her and leaves. Will was avoiding his need for intimacy. The therapist in the movie, Sean, tries to develop trust with Will in order to teach him to let others in and that it’s okay. For example, the scene where Sean is speaking to Will about his past and repeats that it’s not his fault is a way of Sean trying to break that defense Will put up. All these years Will has been repressing his feelings and avoiding intimacy and he believed what happened to him during childhood was his fault. Sean makes him see that it’s really not, and implies Will is better than that. In a way, the therapist opened the doors for Will in order to start developing the affiliation and intimacy skills he needs. At the end, it worked and Will let out his emotions. This is an example of the fear and anxiety people manifest and seek others to comfort those negative emotions. Sean was able to get Will to let out those feelings, and in return Will was able to turn to Sean for comfort, turning into the desire to affiliate with people for emotional support.
Even though Will had a lack of affiliation and intimacy, he still had high relatedness with his group of friends. Will was able to develop communal relationships with these people because they all suffered together in the past and have been the only people loyal to him. What Will was missing with other social groups, like a relationship with a girl and even a family, he gained through this group of friends, especially his best friend Chuckie. Chuckie and Will have a tight social bond. It was clear that he cares about Will’s well-being. For instance, after the break up with Skyler, the two of them are working construction and taking a break. Chuckie tells Will that he hopes every day that when he picks him up from work that he would be gone, because he knows Will deserves a better life than working construction the rest of his life. And later, Chuckie gives Will his own car so he can make the decision to leave and pursue a better future with his geniusness.
Another character who I thought was interesting and clearly showed some of his own psychological and social motivational problems was Professor Lambeau. This character displayed a high social need for power, a high need for achievement, and high competence with a fear of failure. First, he demonstrated his need for power by his leadership, aggressiveness, his occupation, as well as his prestigious possessions, like his medal he won. The Professor has underlying needs for dominance, reputation, and status. He tries to control Will’s future and present behavior by using his status to his benefit. Professor feels threatened by Will’s knowledge because before he came along, the professor thought he was the dominant mind. He also feels threatened because Will doesn’t display a high social status or prestige as the professor worked hard for. The professor displayed his fear of failure when he was arguing with the therapist about Will when he basically said there is no room for failure. His fear of failure is making him escape from feeling challenged by Will. He also has a tendency to avoid failure in order to preserve his self-esteem, social respect from his colleagues, and to avoid embarrassment that someone is actually smarter than him. In reality, professor Lambeau fails to see that failure leads to success. Nonetheless, this character has a high need for competence and clearly enjoys the challenge of his profession. This need is supported by positive feedback. Sean reminds Lambeau that he wasn’t as intelligent as he is now, which is an example of the comparison from past performance to present performance which is a source of positive feedback. Lambeau also compares his performance with his other colleagues and perceives himself as better than the others. The professor expresses his need for high achievement through performance achievement goals. The professor desperately needs to be better than others and makes it seem easy to succeed. It seems he transformed to a person who enjoyed doing mathematics intrinsically, until rewards came into play externally motivating him to outperform others as if it were a competition. He made the transformation of following mastery goals to performance goals over the years as he tried to climb to social status latter. In the scene where Sean and Lambeau are in the bar and Lambeau asks the bartender if he ever heard of three people, he lists a couple well known people and then says his own name, to which to bartender says he’s never heard of. Lambeau was trying to make the point that he isn’t well-known as much as he’d like to be.

TERMS: psychological needs, social needs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, positive reinforcement, punishment, modeling, interpersonal relationships, incentive, hidden costs of rewards, unintended primary effect, avoidant, deficient, affiliation, intimacy, relatedness, communal relationships, power, achievement, tendency to avoid failure, competence, performance goals, positive feedback, competition, mastery goals


Good Will Hunting is an excellent movie, one of my favorites. It is also great for our purpose to find examples of psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness), social needs (achievement, affiliation, intimacy, and power), and both intrinsic and extrinsic motives. This movie can be seen as a complex character study of a gifted and troubled man coming to terms with his place in the world. Will is an intellectual giant while also being an emotional dwarf. I recalled several scenes from memory that would be apt for our discussion before even reviewing the movie. After watching the movie again with the aforementioned topics in mind, I appreciated the movie on another level beyond just entertainment.

The first scene I will discuss is perhaps the most memorable scene in the movie. Will working as a janitor at MIT solves a complex math problem. This scene portrays several concepts from the book. Earlier Will had solved a different math problem anonymously and Professor Lambeau asks for the person who solved it to come forward in packed lecture hall of students. To the disappointment of the professor, no one steps forward. The professor then decides to write out an even more difficult math problem to see if it too will get solved by someone. We see Will the janitor working away at the problem with mop in bucket in tow. The professor and a colleague then enter the hallway to see a janitor (Will) writing on their chalkboard it what they assume is graffiti. Will sees them coming and walks away quickly saying he is sorry. Lambeau yells at him attempting to confront the janitor but Will just exchanges insults with Lambeau and continues to leave. Lambeau then goes back to inspect the chalkboard and to his amazement finds the math problem had been solved correctly.

In the above mentioned scene Will is intrinsically motivated to solve the math problem. No one told him to do it and he was not looking for recognition as he attempted to solve it anonymously. There was not tangible incentive or reward in doing to problem. So in doing the problem just for himself we conclude that it satisfies some of his psychological needs. The need for autonomy states that want to be the one who decides when and how to do things because it gives us a sense of personal freedom. Will works on the math problem unprompted and under his own volition. We will see later in the movie when he is basically forced to do math it is no longer fun. It loses its fun for Will because it goes against his autonomy. It is no longer a perceived choice and it violates his volition. The environment as well as the teacher are not perceived as autonomy supportive by Will.

Working on the math as meets the psychological need of competence for Will. He feels competent because math is something he naturally excels at and with practice he demonstrates mastery. Since he is so gifted it takes very difficult problems to optimally challenge him. We see Will experience flow by working on the problem in this scene as well as others where he is reading books that are optimally challenging for him to comprehend. We will see throughout the movie that when Will is optimally challenged in his relationship with others he is also the most satisfied. When Will is finally able to work through his past issues that have led him to self-destructiveness with the help from his therapist Sean and girlfriend Skylar is when he truly begins to thrive as all of his psychological and social needs are finally being met.

Will feels relatedness and to some degree affiliation will the friends he has grown up with from childhood. They meet his need belong and interact as demonstrated in several scenes such as when they are working construction together or at the bar drinking together. But Will represses most of his inner demons and desires so much so that he is unaware of most of them. Thus he never experiences much intimacy with anyone.

As the movie unfolds Will eventually works through many of his issues with the help of Sean and Skylar. Through their interactions Will learns to trust these two people and is able to fully reach full self-disclosure with each of them. I think all along Will was a person with a higher need of intimacy than he realized. Through past experiences he conditioned himself to be more of a loner and was terrified to really get close to anyone. From Sean he learns to come to terms with his past and become the person he wants. From Skylar he learns to love without condition and to accept that he is worthy to be loved.

The end scene of the movie depicts Will’s need of autonomy has shifted. Before, he was comfortable with casual relationships with others and working menial jobs. He either felt this was all he deserved or all that he needed. He now realizes he needs more. We see Will driving away from his old life. It does not meet his changed need of autonomy. He leaves Boston behind to be with the one person that meets his needs the best. His relationship with Skylar best meets his needs for relatedness and intimacy. She also challenges him intellectually more than his old friends which is also psychologically satisfying.
I enjoyed watching this movie again as well as appreciating it from another perspective.

Terms: psychological needs, autonomy, competence, relatedness, flow, optimum challenge, social needs, achievement, affiliation, intimacy, volition, intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation

Good Will Hunting was a very good movie that had many motivational concepts in it. The movie is about a kid named Will who is an orphan and also a mathematical genius. He grew up and lives in South Boston and he works at MIT. The whole movie is about people trying to get Will to use his gift and do something with his life. There was a lot of psychological and motivational concepts that were easily seen in the movie.

The first thing I am going to talk about is intrinsic motivation. There were a lot of scenes that portrayed intrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation is the propensity to engage one's own interests and to seek out and master challenges. We seen this pretty early in the movie when Will solved the very hard math problem on the board in the hallway. He could of walked by it and not do anything about it but he did. So he went home and solved it on his mirror and came back to the school and solved it on the board. He didn't have to solve it but he did because it was a challenge and he had a psychological need to solve it.

Extrinsic motivation could be seen in the movie also. Extrinsic motivation involves things like environmental incentives to do something and could be things like money or praise. Throughout the whole movie you could tell that Will was not very extrinsically motivated. At any point he could go work somewhere and make a lot of money. But instead he worked as a janitor and didn't care about money or other incentives. On the other hand, Professor Lambeau seemed to be extrinsically motivated about a lot of things. He earned a field medal and he seemed to adore the fact that he got one and didn't care about doing much good with his knowledge. He always seemed to be trying to manipulate Will into doing what he wanted. He also used extrinsic motivation to try and get people to solve the difficult theory problem. He talked about things like praise and recognition to get people to try and solve the problem instead of having people do it for the fun of it.

Autonomy was a very important concept in the movie. Will didn't have an idea of what he wanted to do but he wasn't going to do something just because everyone else wanted him to do it. Sean was trying to get Will to go in whatever direction that Will wanted to go in instead of telling him what to do. He wanted Will to initiate himself into something. He would always tell him that nothing was off limits and he could do anything with his skillset. Professor Lambeau was trying to regulate Will's self-direction and trying to tell him what to do.

Competence is maybe the easiest concept to see in the movie. Many of the people in the movie were very smart. From Will to Professor Lambeau to Sean and to Skyler, most of the characters were very smart. Most of the movie revolved around MIT and Harvard. One scene that showed competence very well was when Skyler was trying to study and Will wanted to take her out but she said that she needed to do the work and she wanted to learn. What Skyler was trying to do was master some challenges and try to learn for herself instead of having Will do her work for her. Relatedness can be seen very well in this movie too. Relatedness is the need to establish close emotional bonds and attachments with other people. Will and Skyler exemplify this very well. They both were displaying relatedness but Will had a very hard time dealing them getting very close because he was worried about abandonment. Sean and Will also developed a very close relationship throughout the movie.

Finally, I could see achievement in the movie. Achievement is the desire to do well relative to a standard of excellence. There was one scene where Will solved a problem while another person in the room couldn't. The guy was very embarassed and one of Lambeau's associates consulted him and said something like he was a very intelligent man to him. The guy felt very ashamed because he wasn't able to achieve the answer that he wanted. Will didn't think much about the achievement but the guy felt really bad because he couldn't do it.

Terms: Psychological Needs, Competence, Achievement, Relatedness, Autonomy, Intrinsic Motivation, Extrinsic Motivation, Standard of Excellence, Needs

The movie Good Will Hunting does an excellent job of demonstrating all different types of motivation and how motivation is adapted and can change throughout a lifetime. The main character, Will, is a janitor at the prestigious MIT in Boston, Massachusetts. He comes across a math problem on the chalk board while cleaning the floor one evening. After he solves the problem he is confronted by the professor who assigned the challenging math proof. The discovery of this great genius throws all of the character into a whirlwind. The rest of the movie deals with Will trying to figure him-self out while resisting the demands of others.

First off, intrinsic motivation clearly plays an enormous role in the movie. The first time we see this demonstrated is when Will approaches the problem assigned by Professor Lambeau. He ponders the problem for a bit, takes it home, and then presents his proof on the board. Will does this purely out of his own enjoyment through intrinsic motivation. Doing this gives will feelings out autonomy and competence. His persistence is incredible; we see him describe to his therapist Sean about reading all different kinds of books just to learn. A profound moment in the movie that shows intrinsic motivation is the bar scene when he first meets Skylar. His friend, Chuckie, while trying to sound intelligent to Skylar, ends up only making a fool of himself by being called out and shown up by a student from MIT. Will steps in to then confront the MIT student about how his knowledge is unoriginal and comes straight from books that are accessible to anyone. Will makes a comment that the students MIT education is overrated. This demonstrates that Will learns to simply learn. He chooses mastery goals to satisfy his high need for competency. The information Will learns is not used to impress others, in this case he is not choosing performance goals. Will doesn’t need incentives or rewards like most others, to solve difficult problems or to learn things most people can’t understand. When given the option to have a high paying job that will shower him with rewards for accomplishing great tasks he turns them down. First, he sends his friend to the interview because he isn’t taking it seriously. Then at the end of the movie when he finally agrees to a job he ends of leaving for California instead to chase after Skylar. Will isn’t motivated by extrinsic things like money and possessions. The one thing in the movie he was truly extrinsically motivated by was the option of getting out of jail if he when to see a therapist and worked on math problems with Lambeau. Will jumped at the opportunity to do so because it wouldn’t take much effort on his part. He resisted seeing the therapist, Sean, at the beginning. However, after making an attachment with Sean by fulfilling his need for relatedness, his motivation changed from extrinsic to intrinsic. At the very last session we see Will not wanting to leave Sean and wishing the sessions would continue. He now want to be there for his own enjoyment and benefits.

The first time I saw this movie, well clips of it, was in my counseling skills class. We viewed clips from the sessions with Sean and Will. It was clear in that class as well as this one that Will has a need for intimacy but doesn’t show it. He pushes people away but longs for deep connections. Sean says something along the lines of Will needed a companion that challenges him. I believe that is a part on intimacy; having a relationship with someone who can support you and push you to be your best. Will is able to satisfy this need, although resisting at first, through his relationships with Sean and Skylar. Both are highly educated individuals who reach for mastery goals. These two people helped Will recognize his potential, yet let him continue to be autonomous with his own life decisions.

Will is a very independent individual. From growing up through orphanages and bailing himself out of jail he hardly needed help from anyone. Will is a person with a high need for autonomy. He wants to be able to control his life and make his own decisions. He encounters different people throughout the movie who either hinder or help satisfy this need. Sean for example, helps satisfy Will’s need for autonomy. In one of their first sessions Sean and Will sit in silence throughout the entire meeting. Sean explains that he does so in order to show Will that he doesn’t need to talk if he doesn’t want to. This is giving Will the choice to either self disclose to Sean or not. Professor Lambeau however, has a high need for power which counteracts Will’s need for autonomy. Lambeau wants Will to be everything he can’t be. He tries to push him into jobs that Will doesn’t want with his controlling motivational style. Lambeau has a plan for Will, but because of his need for autonomy he resists it. Will wants to make his own choices that are going to make him happy.

Terms: Intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, autonomy, competence, intimacy, mastery goals, performance goals, relatedness, power

This movie is an excellent example of the chapters 5 through 7. I have never even heard of this movie before but I was really impressed with the way intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, our psychological needs and our social needs were all portrayed in this movie.

Right off the bat, I noticed at the beginning of the movie how Will had an intrinsic motivation for mathematics. Intrinsic motivation is to engage in one's interests and to exercise one's capacities and in doing so, to seek out optimal challenges. Clearly, Will was finishing these math problems because he had an interest in them and they came easily to him. I think he enjoyed doing them but didn't want praise or any attention from completing these hard math problems. By him doing so, that shows that he was intrinsically motivated whenever he finished a problem. In intrinsic motivation, you also have a psychological need when you nurture and support this certain area, which can lead to a sense of satisfaction when people engage in interesting activities.

Will was a very lucky guy. He encountered many benefits from his autonomy support. His autonomy supporters, were his friends, therapist and his mentor. Autonomy support, is a style of motivating that teachers, parents, therapists and doctors use. I also believe, that Will looked up to his friend Chuckie and he gave Will some good advice at the end of the movie that really helped Will, so I included Chuckie as a autonomy supporter as well. Autonomy support enhances development and each one of Will's supporters wanted him to development into a better person. Leaving his past in the past and moving forward. Will's mentor saw something in Will that nobody else ever saw him in. He saw how brilliant Will was at math and that he had a gift. He wanted to help Will use his talent. Sean, the therapist saw a good in Will as well. He helped Will become a better man and helped him follow his heart and really find what he enjoyed in life.

Friends played a huge role in this movie. Will had a need for relatedness. Relatedness is a need to establish emotional bonds with others. He needed his close bond with his friends because those are the only people that have been there for him his whole life. He couldn't reply on anyone growing up because they all treated him wrong.

I also believe Will had a social need for affiliation. Affiliation is establishing, maintaining, and restoring relationships with another person. Throughout the movie this is a social need that Will had struggled with but we saw that Will had overcome this need by the end of the movie. We noticed that when people started getting close to Will he would pull back and put his guard up. For example, when Will broke up with Skylar. Ultimately, I believe he broke up with her because he was scared he could actually love her, and again she was going to move to California. He might of them felt a sense of abandonment (which he has felt his whole life). By the end of the movie we saw the whole affiliation cycle of establishing a friendship or bond, maintaining that relationship and restoring that very same relationship. Will developed and grew a lot throughout this movie so I think it's a great movie to show for the chapters we discussed in lecture and the readings we did for class.

Terms: intrinsic motivation, psychological needs, social needs, autonomy support, relatedness, affiliation

When the movie first starts off right away you can some intrinsic motivation going on. Will is sitting in his room reading a book with multiple more lying around him. This shows that he reads for the pour enjoyment and knowledge that is intrinsic motivation. Then we are seen in a MIT advanced mathematics class were the professor explain a problem in the hall that if solved will lead to receiving a reward, this acts as a mighty big incentive. Shortly after this class we see Will taking a look at the problem and then walking away. Later that night Will is out with his friends to grab a few drinks but to our surprise he decides to leave, to go work out the problem he seen on the board. This shows a very intrinsically motivated individual that is challenging his competence and set a mastery goal to better his knowledge, if it means success or failure. An important thing to notice here is that he has free range of his autonomy, he chose to work out the problem rather than stay out and drink. When Will goes back to solve the problem along with the following problem, for what is suppose to take the rest of the school year, you can see that Will’s persistence (continuing problem solving) and creativity are high due to the fact that he is not being watched or rewarded.
Throughout the movie Will is forced to undergo multiple therapy sessions as part of an arrangement to stay out of jail. After going through I think it was 3 or 4 therapists, Will comes face-to-face with Sean; a process that can be explained through the organismic approach of adapting, changing, and growing. Sean who starts off by trying to have a conversation about anything with Will, who constantly tries to change the subject. After that the next few sessions are of complete silence as Sean waits for Will to open up first and break the ice, which he does in time with an airplane joke. Sean and Will’s relationship started off as an exchange relationship (one of business) Will didn’t want a relatedness relation with Sean at all. Will didn’t see that opportunity to relate in a caring or emotional way, Sean, through Will’s eyes didn’t have that social bond of friendship nor did he want it. Being abused and tossed around his whole life Will didn’t want to feel that fear of interpersonal rejection (affiliation). As the sessions proceed between the two they start to form a more communal relationship, by both opening up about their personal lives little by little satisfying their intimacy needs, using each other as emotional support to handle the emotions they are feeling from the objects that cause them fear.

To get a few more pieces of the text in here there were a few sense, none in particular, with Professor Lambeau and Will. At first glance one can tell that the Professor is in a high-need for power. Aside from his title as Professor, which establishes power (impact) he also tries to maintain his power (control) by offering up a problem he knows that might not be solved by the students. When Will comes along and solves the problem it doesn’t only threaten his control but also his influence. So when Lambeau comes to Will’s rescue and bails him out of jail time he expects Will to follow two conditions, one being solving problems. It starts off with both of them having fun but later becomes more about Lambeau trying to establish his dominance by making Will solve multiple problems and getting him job offers. This stripped Wills autonomy away and tried to change his perceived locus of causality, less of an internal to more of an external motivation. Going from solving the problems for fun and on his own, to solving the problems for professor Lambeau and being told to go to the job interviews. At the same time the professor’s psychological needs for autonomy and competence were being challenged. The external effect of Will unwilling to change or explain his work affected Lambeau autonomy, accentually giving him a performance goal rather than a mastery goal. The fact that Will was smarter (informational aspect) than Lambeau affected his personal need for competence.
Terms: mastery goal, intrinsic motivation, incentive, autonomy, persistence, creativity, organismic approach, relationship, exchange relationship, relatedness, social bond, interpersonal rejection, affiliation, intimacy needs, communal relationship, power, impact, control, influence, perceived locus of causality, cognitive evaluation theory

I have always enjoyed the movie Good Will Hunting and found it even more interesting to watch now after some psychology courses because it made even more sense. Will Hunting is a good example of someone who does not use their full potential to benefit their well-being and self-purpose. Chapter 5-7 discuss psychological and social needs that are apparent throughout the entire movie. Will seems to be extrinsically motivated but in a negative way. His external environment gives him reason to act out violently by instigating fights, drinking alcohol, and disrespecting the people around him. When Will is given the chance to bypass jail time to work on math problems and see a therapist, it is clear that he is stubborn and doesn’t take the opportunity seriously. The first therapist that meets with Will tells him that the “pressure is destroying your potential.” The pressure he is talking about is coming from Will’s environment, thus causing him to respond negatively. Will Hunting’s need for autonomy is high in the sense that he is self-motivated to solve the mathematical equations without the need for his environments approval. He juggles two jobs as a construction worker and a janitor and lives the life of a low-class citizen, yet he hides his genius talent from his environment. This relates to the class because it shows that Will doesn’t need to be reinforced to solve math problems, he is self-motivated to. This means that his need for competence is low because he doesn’t wish to engage or interact with his environment to be motivated. He didn’t seek out the challenge to solve those two equations in order for his environment to notice, he simply did them for his own well-being. Relatedness was visible a lot during the movie. Will seems to relate to Sean mainly because he is the first therapist that can actually get through to them. During their first session, you can tell that Will starts to open up after he sees Sean’s military photo and book collection. The two seem to share similar characteristics such as an abusive past and high level of intelligence so they can easily relate to one another. Because of this strong need for relatedness, Will actually listens to what Sean has to say instead of shutting his outside environment out like he had been doing his whole life. During a meeting in a park, Sean lays into Will for being an arrogant child and tells him that his knowledge only consists of facts and no real emotions or experiences. He tells Will that he doesn’t know what real loss is because he has never loved anyone more than he loves himself which shows his level of self-direction. I liked when Sean compared the situation to Oliver Twist. Will and Oliver are both orphans, but just because Sean read the book Oliver Twist doesn’t mean that he truly knows Will Hunting. Throughout the movie is becomes apparent that the two men somewhat counsel each other. Will can read Sean just and well as Sean can read Will, so they seem to help each other along the way. For social needs, Will doesn’t seem to has a high need to achievement. He is a janitor at a prestigious university and yet has the intelligence to be a student there. Achievement goes along with impressing yourself and others and that wasn’t something that Will seemed to strive for. Along with this, his need for affiliation was also low, because until the end of the movie, he wasn’t worried about pleasing anyone not even himself. The need for intimacy comes up a lot when Will is at his therapy sessions with Sean. Sean shares a lot of information with Will about his widowed wife and how in love with her she was and I think that helped Will take a chance with Skyler and increase his level of intimacy.

Overall, I believe that any movie shows principles related to motivation and emotion because the purpose of a movie is to portray real life and in real life motivation guides our every behavior. Will Hunting improved his self-perception and well-being by the end of the film by allowing himself to increase his need for relatedness and trust his environment. I think the movie did an amazing job of showing us that intelligence is not just bought with tuition and that no matter what school (if any school at all) and no matter the background or past experiences, people can still succeed and be knowledgeable.

Terms: extrinsic motivation, autonomy, competence, relatedness, achievement, affiliation, intimacy, motivation, emotion, psychological needs, social needs, self-motivated, self-directed

Good Will Hunting was a great movie, one that I had not seen before and one that I will definitely watch again. In the movie there were many of concepts from chapters 5-7.

The first concepts that I want to talk about is how Will has no intrinsic motivation to go after Skylar after it is obvious that she likes him. Intrinsic motivation is the propensity to engage one’s interests and to exercise one’s capacities and, in doing so, to seek out and master optimal challenges. Skylar makes moves all the time to show that she is interested in Will, but Will doesn’t want to show his feelings. This also will lead me into my next concept. Will has a medium need for intimacy. Intimacy is the social motive for engaging in warm, close, positive interpersonal relationships that produce positive emotions and hold little threat of rejection. You can tell that will has a medium need for intimacy because he gets close to Skylar, but than at the same time he doesn’t want to get too close to her because he has had so many people in the past give up on him, but he can’t see that Skylar maybe different, but doesn’t give her a chance.

Will also has a low need for affiliation. Affiliation involves establishing, maintaining, and restoring relationships with others, mostly to escape from and to avoid negative emotions such as disapproval and loneness. You can see throughout the movie with all of the psychologist Will sees and especially with Professor Gerald Lambeau and Dr. Sean Maguire because they are trying to help direct him in the right direction and Will doesn’t think that either of them have his best interest in mind. Will does have close affiliation with his group of 3 friends and it takes his close friend Chuckie to tells Will that it would be an insult to his friends for Will to waste his potential, and that his fondest wish is that Will leaves to pursue something to help improve his life, to get Will to finally start trusting Professor Lambeau and Sean.

Will also has a high need for achievement. Will is a very intelligent guy and when Professor Lambeau put those problems out on the chalkboard and Will solved them. Will also reads a lot of books and says something along the lines of college is a waste of your time because everything can be learned from reading books. Professor Lambeau also has a high need for achievement, but also has a fear of failure. He choose to take in Will after knowing his criminal past because of Will’s intelligence and Professor Lambeau is not going to fail on getting Will to change from his past and use his intelligence for something useful, becoming a Field-Medal recipient like Lambeau had done himself. Professor Lambeau even resorted to visiting his old college roommate Sean to help get Will headed in the right direction.

Terms Used: Achievement, Fear of Failure, Affiliation, Intimacy, Intrinsic Motivation

This was my first time watching the film Good Will Hunting; I was very surprised about the way in which the film progressed. Will is a very intelligent man who struggles to obtain and develop positive relationships with others. This movie is perfect when reflecting on the psychological and social needs and how we react with our environment. In his environment there are numerous punishers and reinforcements which ay times do not work in his favor. Throughout the film Will illustrates to us the perfect example of someone who struggles to fulfill their needs and then shows that when these needs are developed we are able to strive in our environment and life.

Initially at the start of the movie I believe that Will is extrinsic motivated. He holds a job due to the environment and social context which he lives, without money he would be unable to support his habits of drinking and smoking. While the overall way motivation I sense from will is due to social context and environmental incentives. The first scene of Will working as a janitor in the college and he proceeds to examine the math theorem I find that he is intrinsically motivated. He takes interest in the problem on the board because he seeks an optimal challenge. He also finds a vast interest in reading a lot of material, this is illustrated through his home environment and his knowledge expressed throughout the movie. His knowledge shows how he is able to self-motivate and he finds and internal reward of achieving this amount of knowledge. During the first math theorem scene Will shows the amount of competence he has. The psychological need of competence is not really recognized by him though, while he desires his ability to complete this problem he struggles with fulfilling other needs. Another display of Will’s competence is when the professor gives him problems and Will expresses to him that they are too easy. He is able to complete these tasks but still desires more optimal challenges to feel as if he is succeeding in his need of competence.

Initially when I saw the court scene I realized that for Will previous run-ins with the law and the effect of being punished was very minimal. The fighting and trouble with the law which is occurring in Will’s life is support for the Person-Environment dialectic, where the environment acts on the individual and he has to react, this relationship goes back and forth between the environment and the individual. There was no punisher present because the probability of the future behavior did not decrease. This current case of fighting was now punished but due to Professor Gerald Lambeau’s interest in Will’s exceptional intelligence his punishment is therapy and working with the professor. Will and Sean were introduced due to this arrangement; I would like to discuss the relationship between Sean (Robin Williams) and Will (Matt Damon). At the beginning of the relationship Will and Sean struggle to be on a level of therapist and patient. Will does not want go to a therapist but he has no autonomy in this situation, I believe this is why Will struggles to open up at first. But Sean does a wonderful job of giving Will the choice to being discussing his life, fulfilling the psychological need of autonomy. Sean, the therapist, has a very autonomy-supportive style where he is able to listen to Will and give him the choice to participate in the session. Due to the positive support from Sean the relationship between Will and he is beneficial, Will engages in conversation and the plus side of this is Will is able to develop and reach his full potential in intelligence.

Both Sean and Professor Gerald Lambeau support Will’s competence. The difference between Sean and the professor is the way in which they attempt to structure Will’s environment and future. The professor desires that Will become fully involved in a job which will challenge his ability, but Sean struggles with professor doing this because Will still doesn’t fulfill his social and psychological needs. The relationship between Skyler and Will struggles to develop because Will does not want to fully develop the affiliation and intimacy needs. Skyler struggles with the relationship because Will does not have mutual development of the relationship due to the lack of intimacy during his childhood. For Will he would be evidence against what the book says, he doesn’t show fear of being isolated because he has always been separated and abused. The relationship between Skyler and Will is considered a communal relationship because they both care about each other’s well-being and want to support each other. I feel that the relationship between the professor and Will is more of an exchange relationships because he somewhat uses Will for his ability to solve theorems. For Will and Sean the relationship starts as more of an exchange relationship but then turns into a communal relationship because they talk with each other and their difficult lives.

Will and Sean were able to discuss the difficulty of abuse and lack of intimacy Will had to go through while an orphan. It was brought to our attention that the abuse and mistreatment Will went though was internalized, he believed that this abuse was his fault and I believe this was one of the main reasons why he could not fulfill his needs. Once Sean got through to Will that the abuse and mistreatment was not his fault Will was able to leave his familiar environment and pursue Skyler. This shows that Will is going to attempt and fulfill the need to intimacy. The ending when Will gave Sean the note about going to see a girl was my favorite part, it shows that he is able to finally see that the achievement he gets through math is not the only need he should fulfill. The importance of developing positive relationships for Will is something he has not had for most of his life.

Terms: Intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, optimal challenge, autonomy, affiliation and intimacy, achievement, competence, relatedness, communal and exchange relationships, person-environment dialectic, social needs, psychological needs, structure, motivation, social context.

Good Will Hunting was full of material that directly related to what we have learned in the course. There is evidence of the social needs of achievement, affiliation, intimacy, and power. There is also evidence of the psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. There is also enough evidence for us to see how each character is motivated in their actions. Since there are so many different things we can discuss, I am going to discuss three different topics we have learned about and their appearances in the movie.

In the movie, one of the first examples that stood out to me was the scene at the Harvard bar when Will confronts the Harvard guy that is picking on his friend Chuckie. Will goes off on a nice rant pointing out how the guy was only using information that he just learned to make himself sound smarter than Chuckie. He then proceeds to point out that the guy is plagiarizing stuff he just learned to sound smarter. This short segment is evidence of Will’s need for competence. It initially starts out as defensive to get the guy off of Chuckie’s back. In the process, however, Will is rattling out much more information than necessary trying to prove that just because Will isn’t going to Harvard, he is smarter than the first year graduate student that was initially trying to show how dumb (in his mind) Chuckie and his friends from Southie are. Will ends up ultimately proving, whether consciously or not, that he is smarter than Mr. Harvard.

The second topic I will discuss is Professor Lambeau and his high need for power. Throughout the movie there are many examples of this need. When we first meet him, he is telling the class about a difficult theorem he has posted that they can hopefully solve by the end of the semester after learning from him. We then witness him having a discussion with one of his female students during Will’s first therapy session. It appears that Professor Lambeau is trying to seduce her because he is talking with her in a casual position with his arm over the chair, he’s smiling, and he is talking to her about how a certain topic is erotic. He is trying to use his power as a professor to seduce her. The evidence of his need for power is very clear in his discussion with Sean in Sean’s office shortly after Chuckie pretends to be Will in an interview. Lambeau says that Sean is undermining “what I’m trying to do here.” That sentence is evidence that he is trying to influence Will into doing what Lambeau would like him to so that he can then take the credit as his mentor. Lambeau also talks about how he thinks that Sean is jealous of Lambeau’s success. Sean even points out how Lambeau surrounds himself with people that worship him because he was a Fields Medal winner. We learned that power is shown through four separate conditions. All four of these are very clear with Professor Lambeau. One is influential occupations and as a professor Lambeau certainly has an influential occupation. Another one is aggressiveness. This is very evident in Lambeau whenever he discusses things with Sean because he raises his voice and gets upset (not smiling, looking away) when Sean won’t agree with him. The other two are leadership and recognition and prestige possessions. His Fields Medal is evidence of both of those items because it is a notorious object (possession) and he receives a lot of recognition for winning it.

Finally, Will Hunting is a very complex character. We could easily talk about his various needs but I would prefer to discuss his motivation. Will is not attending any sort of school or taking any courses anywhere. However, he knows a lot of information and is very intelligent. An intelligent person still needs to actually learn stuff from someone or something. This is evidence that Will reads and he reads quite a bit. Since he isn’t taking any sort of courses, however, this is evidence of Will’s motivation. Since he isn’t forced to read or learn, we know that Will is intrinsically motivated to learn new information. However, Will is extrinsically motivated to attend the therapy sessions because it is either attend, or go to jail. We know that this is extrinsically motivated because that is the same way that Professor Lambeau puts it for Will when he is trying to recruit him.

Terms Used: Social Needs, Achievement, Affiliation, Intimacy, Power, Psychological Needs, Autonomy, Competence, Relatedness, Influential Occupation, Aggressiveness, Leadership and Recognition, Prestige Possessions, Motivation, Intrinsically Motivated, Extrinsically Motivated

In the beginning of the movie, the professor informed his students that anyone who could complete the math problem that took some of the greatest mathematicians 2 years to figure out, they would go on to fame and fortune, and their work would be published. These three factors display examples of incentives, positive reinforcement and extrinsic motivators. Even when some of the most prestigious students couldn’t figure out the problem, Will completed it without a degree of any sort and didn’t care for these tremendous incentives. This avoidance behavior can be explained through external regulation of motivation. Although the outcome seemed desirable, Will was afraid of the consequences. In this case he thought consequences would be sitting behind a desk all day doing elementary math. Despite the fact that many people spent years earning a degree in mathematics, spending over $100,000 on their education to get where Will was without any training; he saw the incentives as a punishment rather than a reward. Will didn’t think it was necessary to spend money on college when he could acquire the same knowledge at the library. However, he was intrinsically motivated to continue to learn, although he had no intention to earn a degree, or get a job with higher pay. It wasn’t until the professor gave him an ultimatum that extrinsic motivators started to play a role in his life, such as privileges. Overall he stayed intrinsically motivates because he wasn’t concerned with the external influences. Along with this, he had no need for competition because he knew he was smarter than nearly everyone he worked with at Harvard. Introjected regulation nearly summarizes Will’s behavior throughout the movie. He was self-endorsing other people’s demands and motivated through guilt. The only reason he was going to therapy and working with the professor, was because it was a better option than jail.

When considering Will’s psychological needs, social support and intellectual stimulation were the two prominent needs displayed. Clearly, with his difficult past it was hard for him to trust anyone other than his 3 friends. Even when he started hanging out with Skylar, he was submissive and dishonest, but he continued to hang out with her because of his social needs. Will portrayed the ultimate autonomous behavior. He made all of his decisions on his own, and didn’t care what anyone else had to say. Although the professor meant well, he was pressuring Will to become a mathematician, whereas his therapist promoted an autonomy-supportive atmosphere.

Surprisingly, the book says everyone wants and strives to be competent, yet Will had the upmost competence but didn’t want to utilize it. This can partially be explained by failure tolerance. Will didn’t doubt his competence, but he was afraid of failure. As he stated in his interview with NSA, even with the most desirable job in the world, he would feel like he was failing his neighbors. People that work hard for their money and get punished because of a formula he gave the government to bomb a certain village, which in turn would affect possibly thousands of people he never met. Will also displayed the tendency to avoid failure when he broke up with Skylar. He even told his therapist that he didn’t want to call her because at that point she was perfect and he didn’t want to ruin that. What he didn’t mention was that he was afraid she would find something wrong with him. Once he realized that his childhood experiences weren’t his fault and he deserved to have a better life, he revealed a tendency to approach success when he took the initiative to apply for a job or drive to California to apologize to Skylar.

Terms: incentive, positive reinforcers, extrinsic motivators, punishment, reward, intrinsically motivated, extrinsic motivators, privileges, competition, introjected regulation, autonomy, psychological needs, social needs, intellectual stimulation, autonomy-supportive, competence, failure tolerance, tendency to avoid failure, tendency to approach success.

In the beginning of the movie, the professor informed his students that anyone who could complete the math problem that took some of the greatest mathematicians 2 years to figure out, they would go on to fame and fortune, and their work would be published. These three factors display examples of incentives, positive reinforcement and extrinsic motivators. Even when some of the most prestigious students couldn’t figure out the problem, Will completed it without a degree of any sort and didn’t care for these tremendous incentives. This avoidance behavior can be explained through external regulation of motivation. Although the outcome seemed desirable, Will was afraid of the consequences. In this case he thought consequences would be sitting behind a desk all day doing elementary math. Despite the fact that many people spent years earning a degree in mathematics, spending over $100,000 on their education to get where Will was without any training; he saw the incentives as a punishment rather than a reward. Will didn’t think it was necessary to spend money on college when he could acquire the same knowledge at the library. However, he was intrinsically motivated to continue to learn, although he had no intention to earn a degree, or get a job with higher pay. It wasn’t until the professor gave him an ultimatum that extrinsic motivators started to play a role in his life, such as privileges. Overall he stayed intrinsically motivates because he wasn’t concerned with the external influences. Along with this, he had no need for competition because he knew he was smarter than nearly everyone he worked with at Harvard. Introjected regulation nearly summarizes Will’s behavior throughout the movie. He was self-endorsing other people’s demands and motivated through guilt. The only reason he was going to therapy and working with the professor, was because it was a better option than jail.

When considering Will’s psychological needs, social support and intellectual stimulation were the two prominent needs displayed. Clearly, with his difficult past it was hard for him to trust anyone other than his 3 friends. Even when he started hanging out with Skylar, he was submissive and dishonest, but he continued to hang out with her because of his social needs. Will portrayed the ultimate autonomous behavior. He made all of his decisions on his own, and didn’t care what anyone else had to say. Although the professor meant well, he was pressuring Will to become a mathematician, whereas his therapist promoted an autonomy-supportive atmosphere.

Surprisingly, the book says everyone wants and strives to be competent, yet Will had the upmost competence but didn’t want to utilize it. This can partially be explained by failure tolerance. Will didn’t doubt his competence, but he was afraid of failure. As he stated in his interview with NSA, even with the most desirable job in the world, he would feel like he was failing his neighbors. People that work hard for their money and get punished because of a formula he gave the government to bomb a certain village, which in turn would affect possibly thousands of people he never met. Will also displayed the tendency to avoid failure when he broke up with Skylar. He even told his therapist that he didn’t want to call her because at that point she was perfect and he didn’t want to ruin that. What he didn’t mention was that he was afraid she would find something wrong with him. Once he realized that his childhood experiences weren’t his fault and he deserved to have a better life, he revealed a tendency to approach success when he took the initiative to apply for a job or drive to California to apologize to Skylar.

Terms: incentive, positive reinforcers, extrinsic motivators, punishment, reward, intrinsically motivated, extrinsic motivators, privileges, competition, introjected regulation, autonomy, psychological needs, social needs, intellectual stimulation, autonomy-supportive, competence, failure tolerance, tendency to avoid failure, tendency to approach success.

In the beginning of the movie, the professor informed his students that anyone who could complete the math problem that took some of the greatest mathematicians 2 years to figure out, they would go on to fame and fortune, and their work would be published. These three factors display examples of incentives, positive reinforcement and extrinsic motivators. Even when some of the most prestigious students couldn’t figure out the problem, Will completed it without a degree of any sort and didn’t care for these tremendous incentives. This avoidance behavior can be explained through external regulation of motivation. Although the outcome seemed desirable, Will was afraid of the consequences. In this case he thought consequences would be sitting behind a desk all day doing elementary math. Despite the fact that many people spent years earning a degree in mathematics, spending over $100,000 on their education to get where Will was without any training; he saw the incentives as a punishment rather than a reward. Will didn’t think it was necessary to spend money on college when he could acquire the same knowledge at the library. However, he was intrinsically motivated to continue to learn, although he had no intention to earn a degree, or get a job with higher pay. It wasn’t until the professor gave him an ultimatum that extrinsic motivators started to play a role in his life, such as privileges. Overall he stayed intrinsically motivates because he wasn’t concerned with the external influences. Along with this, he had no need for competition because he knew he was smarter than nearly everyone he worked with at Harvard. Introjected regulation nearly summarizes Will’s behavior throughout the movie. He was self-endorsing other people’s demands and motivated through guilt. The only reason he was going to therapy and working with the professor, was because it was a better option than jail.

When considering Will’s psychological needs, social support and intellectual stimulation were the two prominent needs displayed. Clearly, with his difficult past it was hard for him to trust anyone other than his 3 friends. Even when he started hanging out with Skylar, he was submissive and dishonest, but he continued to hang out with her because of his social needs. Will portrayed the ultimate autonomous behavior. He made all of his decisions on his own, and didn’t care what anyone else had to say. Although the professor meant well, he was pressuring Will to become a mathematician, whereas his therapist promoted an autonomy-supportive atmosphere.

Surprisingly, the book says everyone wants and strives to be competent, yet Will had the upmost competence but didn’t want to utilize it. This can partially be explained by failure tolerance. Will didn’t doubt his competence, but he was afraid of failure. As he stated in his interview with NSA, even with the most desirable job in the world, he would feel like he was failing his neighbors. People that work hard for their money and get punished because of a formula he gave the government to bomb a certain village, which in turn would affect possibly thousands of people he never met. Will also displayed the tendency to avoid failure when he broke up with Skylar. He even told his therapist that he didn’t want to call her because at that point she was perfect and he didn’t want to ruin that. What he didn’t mention was that he was afraid she would find something wrong with him. Once he realized that his childhood experiences weren’t his fault and he deserved to have a better life, he revealed a tendency to approach success when he took the initiative to apply for a job or drive to California to apologize to Skylar.

Terms: incentive, positive reinforcers, extrinsic motivators, punishment, reward, intrinsically motivated, extrinsic motivators, privileges, competition, introjected regulation, autonomy, psychological needs, social needs, intellectual stimulation, autonomy-supportive, competence, failure tolerance, tendency to avoid failure, tendency to approach success.

In the beginning of the movie, the professor informed his students that anyone who could complete the math problem that took some of the greatest mathematicians 2 years to figure out, they would go on to fame and fortune, and their work would be published. These three factors display examples of incentives, positive reinforcement and extrinsic motivators. Even when some of the most prestigious students couldn’t figure out the problem, Will completed it without a degree of any sort and didn’t care for these tremendous incentives. This avoidance behavior can be explained through external regulation of motivation. Although the outcome seemed desirable, Will was afraid of the consequences. In this case he thought consequences would be sitting behind a desk all day doing elementary math. Despite the fact that many people spent years earning a degree in mathematics, spending over $100,000 on their education to get where Will was without any training; he saw the incentives as a punishment rather than a reward. Will didn’t think it was necessary to spend money on college when he could acquire the same knowledge at the library. However, he was intrinsically motivated to continue to learn, although he had no intention to earn a degree, or get a job with higher pay. It wasn’t until the professor gave him an ultimatum that extrinsic motivators started to play a role in his life, such as privileges. Overall he stayed intrinsically motivates because he wasn’t concerned with the external influences. Along with this, he had no need for competition because he knew he was smarter than nearly everyone he worked with at Harvard. Introjected regulation nearly summarizes Will’s behavior throughout the movie. He was self-endorsing other people’s demands and motivated through guilt. The only reason he was going to therapy and working with the professor, was because it was a better option than jail.
When considering Will’s psychological needs, social support and intellectual stimulation were the two prominent needs displayed. Clearly, with his difficult past it was hard for him to trust anyone other than his 3 friends. Even when he started hanging out with Skylar, he was submissive and dishonest, but he continued to hang out with her because of his social needs. Will portrayed the ultimate autonomous behavior. He made all of his decisions on his own, and didn’t care what anyone else had to say. Although the professor meant well, he was pressuring Will to become a mathematician, whereas his therapist promoted an autonomy-supportive atmosphere.
Surprisingly, the book says everyone wants and strives to be competent, yet Will had the upmost competence but didn’t want to utilize it. This can partially be explained by failure tolerance. Will didn’t doubt his competence, but he was afraid of failure. As he stated in his interview with NSA, even with the most desirable job in the world, he would feel like he was failing his neighbors. People that work hard for their money and get punished because of a formula he gave the government to bomb a certain village, which in turn would affect possibly thousands of people he never met. Will also displayed the tendency to avoid failure when he broke up with Skylar. He even told his therapist that he didn’t want to call her because at that point she was perfect and he didn’t want to ruin that. What he didn’t mention was that he was afraid she would find something wrong with him. Once he realized that his childhood experiences weren’t his fault and he deserved to have a better life, he revealed a tendency to approach success when he took the initiative to apply for a job or drive to California to apologize to Skylar.

Terms: incentive, positive reinforcers, extrinsic motivators, punishment, reward, intrinsically motivated, extrinsic motivators, privileges, competition, introjected regulation, autonomy, psychological needs, social needs, intellectual stimulation, autonomy-supportive, competence, failure tolerance, tendency to avoid failure, tendency to approach success.

In the movie, the main character, Will, is an orphaned young man with much potential but quite a past that keeps him from reaching it fully. While watching the movie I found that each of the characters that were shown more often had very strong needs that were represented. The math professor had a very strong social need for achievement as well as a higher need for power. In a few scenes these were very obvious. There is one particular scene that shows his need of achievement and mastery. Will is in his office and shows him a proof that he has solved. The professor questions it and does not quite want to believe that he could be wrong and that Will is correct (and better/ more competent) in mathematics than he is. He even says to Will that it is hard for him to sleep at night knowing that there is someone like him (Will) out in the world, and that is wasting his potential.

As I have stated, there was also a need for competence. Being a professor at MIT and winning awards for his math he believes that he is the most capable of this and he knows what would be right. The math professor also, in my opinion showed a higher need for power. In some of the later scenes in the movie when he is discussing what Will should do with his life, with Sean, the counselor, he seems as thought he is trying to exert power over the situation. He believes that all Will needs is direction and he does not have much choice around that. The professor makes sure of this by setting up interviews for Will, keeping him involved in solving the proofs, and constantly interfering with his counseling sessions.

Will thought he knew what he wanted out of life and for his future, but it wasn’t until talking with Sean that he figured out he needed to take a chance. Will in the beginning of the movie had a very low need for intimacy. He was avoidant in his attachment and would push others away so he did not need to feel the hurt and pain when they left him. When he met Scarlet he started to open up, but still kept up his defenses. Will showed that he did have a psychological need for relatedness through the constant interaction with his friends. He was only willing to be intimate with others that had proved themselves trustworthy enough to be there. That sense of relatedness was also what was going to keep Will in Boston and grow old with his friends until the day he died.

He was a very complex character in that he knew how to work others. In the scene with Sean in his second counseling session, he does not speak a word. This was Will trying to keep is autonomy through the long process of staying out of jail. He knew he did not have to speak if he did not want to, which is exactly what he did. His sense of autonomy and competence was also shown when he left the bar early in the night to go home to figure out the math problem. He was intrinsically motivated to go home and do the math. He had no other reason to do the math proof other than to gain some sort of competence from completing it.

Will also shows his autonomy when he chooses what he wants to do with his life and he sticks to it rather than listening to the professor. I thought it was interesting in the movie how Sean believed so much in Will to do the right thing for himself that he supported him in whatever decision he made. In the text this was called autonomy supportive motivating style. He was motivating Will to do the right thing, but listening to what Will wanted and needed and he supported that.

Overall, this movie did a great job of presenting a lot of the information from our text. I felt as thought there was an underlying theme throughout the whole movie of autonomy (Will have control of his own destiny), competence (the professor needing mastery), relatedness (the constant battle for Will between opening himself to others), as well as many of the social needs as stated in the post.

Terms: psychological needs, social needs, competence, power, achievement, intimacy, relatedness, intrinsic motivation, autonomy, autonomy-supportive motivating style, mastery goal

By displaying Will’s search for his self by being intrinsically motivated with a strong autonomy-supportive environment, Good Will Hunting is a perfect example of how the difference between being intrinsically motivated and extrinsically motivated can determine how you achieve throughout your life.

At the very beginning of the movie, Professor Lambeau displays extrinsic motivation by telling his students about what they would receive if they figured out the difficult math problem. By offering a reward, Lambeau is motivating his students using a positive reinforce to motivate them. He also displays his need for having power through math with wanting a student to help him further his career, and probably is extrinsically motivated through his major math award he received. When Will goes to figure out the theorem, it is obvious he is intrinsically motivated because he has no clue about any reward for if he gets it correct. Also, Will displays being intrinsically motivated throughout the movie by reading and loving books while gaining extraordinary knowledge that is displayed throughout the movie, yet he does not go to college and works at a janitor. This means his education is important to him, but he does not care if he gets anything for it and enjoys the way he learns. His competence need was filled when randomly choosing to do this, while his autonomy need is filled by doing what he wants (such as not going to college and hanging out with his friends instead).

Leading into, the scene at the bar when Chuckie tries introducing himself to the girls he spots and the “blonde-history-guy” comes over to argue, Will argues back and displays his knowledge through history and uses his competence in doing so while also seeking out the power need in his opponent. By saying that Will spends little money on his education instead of “dropping 250, 00” like the other guy did. By saying how much he remembers from reading the same history book, once again his intrinsic motivation is displayed because he remembers more information from it through his own eyes instead of just “plagiarizing”, as he claims the other guy does. The blonde guy obviously displays being extrinsically motivated by saying at least he’ll have a degree after graduating and money, as well as having a high power need because of how he uses his so called knowledge and schooling to impress Skylar.

Throughout the movie, Will displays his need for achievement but his avoidance tendency’s of expressing his knowledge by moving forward with a job shows his fear of failing as well as a fear of intimacy with his girlfriend Skylar by not wanting to talk about a lot of things and opening up to Sean in therapy. He is embarrassed to first explain to Skylar that his brothers mean he is an orphan, and always wants to go to her place because his place is not as nice. His social need for intimacy is hidden due to his lack of trust by being abandoned by his parents, but eventually fills this need for intimacy at the end due to his strong autonomy-supported environment created by his friends (Mostly Chuckie who tells him that he is a pussy for not taking an opportunity and better do it for him because in 50 years he’ll be stuck there doing the same construction job), his therapist Sean (who pushes him and opens his eyes through offering negative feedback at the beginning about Will being a cocky, scared shitless, kid as well as love by telling stories of his strong relatedness he had when with his wife), and Professor Lambeau who starts him with the math in the first place.

Overall, after not watching Good Will Hunting since I was probably ten, I was highly impressed with how touching and “real” this movie was by strongly exhibiting all psychological, physiological, and social needs. Watching movies that are high in relatedness with me highly grab my attention as well as intrinsically motivating me to want to watch it.
Terms: psychological needs, physiological needs, social needs, intimacy, autonomy, relatedness, failure tolerance, power, autonomy-supportive environment, extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation, reward, negative feedback

There are many different forms of extrinsic motivation in the movie Good Will Hunting. Extrinsic motivation creates the start of an activity based out of environmental factors. There are four kinds of extrinsic motivation: external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, and integrated regulation. Will Hunting starts seeing a therapist because he is ordered by the court to do so. This is an example of external regulation. External regulated behaviors are done to satisfy an external demand. Introjected motivation is a “because I should” motivation. Will asked Skylar to spend time with him. She was reluctant because she said she really needed to get some homework done. She really didn’t want to do her homework instead of relax with Will, but the idea of needing to do homework and study has been pushed onto her by her parents, professors, and fellow students that she starts to adopt the idea as her own. Sean continues to meet with Will even after their disastrous first appointment because he saw something special in Will. Sean thought it was important that he keep meeting with Will. This is an example of identified regulation. Identified regulation is motivation that arises from a feeling of the behavior being significant. . Sean stands up for Will when Jerry is trying to push him too hard into conforming to what Jerry wants for him. Sean says he is sticking up for Will because it is just who he is. This is an example of integrated regulation. Integrated regulation is the motivation to make actions reflect a person’s own values. Amotivation is the absence of motivation. Will sent Chuckie to meet with businessmen for a job offer because he did not value the idea of working for that company doing tasks he found unimportant. Intrinsic motivation is enjoyment and interest that causes a behavior. Will reads so many books because he enjoys it. He peruses knowledge because it satisfies him. That displays the idea of intrinsic regulation.

Will shows the psychological need of relatedness through out the movie. He pushed away Sean and Skylar when they were getting too close because he had been affected psychologically by not forming emotional relationships through his childhood when he bounced from foster home to foster home. Will had a rocky relationship with Skylar, which demonstrated more of his need for relatedness. He doesn’t tell her the truth about his dark past because he was afraid that she would reject him. He didn’t want to leave Boston to go to California with her because he did not want to leave behind the close emotional relationships that he has had with his friends for such a long time. His need for relatedness wins out when he moves to California to “see about a girl”.

Terms: Extrinsic Motivation, External Regulation, Introjected Regulation, Identified Regulation, Integrated Regulation, Amotivation, Intrinsic Motivation, Intrinsic Regulation, Psychological Need, Relatedness

So, I watched the movie in class today and therefore didn't get to finish the whole thing, But I definitely think that I will rent it to see how the rest plays out.

The movie starts out with a professor telling his class that they have all semester to solve a problem that has taken genius mathematicians years to come up with a proof for. He tries to motivate his students by tapping into their achievement and affiliation needs. They would personally feel competent and successful by completing the problem, which satisfies personal achievement needs. They would also get recognition and fame for their work, which would fulfill affiliation needs. It would open them up to many more connections in the math world that could advance their career and get them noticed even further, which also fulfill achievement and affiliation needs.

Will comes along and solves the problem but doesn't go to receive recognition for it. He is entirely intrinsically motivated, because there are no external rewards or recognition for it. For him, the feelings of competence and satisfaction from solving the problem is enough of a reward. When he gets caught solving the second problem, he runs off and avoids getting recognized for his work.
Will's high achievement needs are also evident in the vast amount of reading he does. He clearly has read up on art, economics, and some psychology and learns a great deal from them. He takes pride in mastery of skills. He also has a tendency to avoid failure, as seen in his relationship with Skylar. He tells Sean that he doesn't think he'll call her because she seems perfect still and he doesn't want to ruin it, and Sean correctly identifies that it is in fact Will who feels he will ruin his own 'perfect' image and fail. He withdraws from the situation temporarily until he feels he's reached a point where his chances of success are enough that the incentives are worthwhile to him.
I also think he has a high power need. He uses his intelligence to exert control and influence his environment. He annoys the therapists by playing along and then 'proving' to them that he can see right through their therapy techniques. He uses his economics knowledge to shut down the MIT student in the bar. Part of the reason I think he shut down the student was to fulfill an intimacy need and stick up for his friend, who is clearly incapable of arguing with the guy on an intellectual level. Will also fulfills his power needs when he and his friends assault the guys that used to pick on Will in school. Will then further tries to control his environment (the courtroom, possibility of going to jail) by using his knowledge of archaic law to get himself out of trouble. As the judge points out, this is far from the first time he's gotten arrested for assault and gotten himself out of it.
Will was probably socialized into this high need for power and control. As he movie progresses, it is discovered that Will suffered a lot of abuse in his childhood and was bounced between foster homes, which can strip a person of feeling in control of their life. When he finally gets out on his own, he needs to exert control over his environment in order to receive the autonomy and power he didn't have as a child.

Terms: motivation, achievement, affiliation, intimacy, mastery, competence, needs, autonomy, power, control over environment, socialized, withdraw, tendency to avoid failure, intrinsic motivation, external rewards

Good Will Hunting is an excellent story of the intellectually extraordinary man Will Hunting. This movie is riddled with more than enough examples of what our class and textbook has been discussing in terms of types of motivation, psychological needs, social needs, and rewards/punishers. Examining this book as a college level student who is tuned into the ideas of motivation and emotion it is very easy to tell that Will has serious needs that are not being satisfied in an environment that inhibits that. I have picked out a few examples that we have discussed to talk about in this blog.
The first thing I noticed about Will is that he does not do the intellectual things he does to gain social acceptance from others or to find their praise( an issue I will address later. His psychological needs for autonomy and competence and endless. The whole premise of the movie is the idea of the kid not wanting to be constricted by those around him. He loves his own choices and will not see it any other way. Pick almost any situation and you will see his autonomy. The right to speak in court when most will just sit and listen, his choice to talk to his therapist, his decision on a job and whether or not to show up was all his will(pun intended) He made the decision to rebel against the constraints placed on him by people he did not believe to be his superiors or equals for that matter.

Next was the fairly obvious idea of competence. Will was obviously extremely smart and competent in several ares. He also did not need people telling him he was competent because he knew he was. His need for challenges were boundless. The movie told us that he read several book and the material didn't matter because he just wanted to be competent. Skylar even made it clear when she said that, "nobody does organic chemistry for fun." He really doesn't either, but he loves the feeling of competence it gives him. Even in his love life he loves to be challenged and says so himself. He says he is afraid to get involved with someone and one day find out that they are boring and he doesn't feel attracted anymore. Skylar becomes that for him because she challenges him to think about himself and try to be competent and know who he is.
In the manner of competence another idea comes to mind and that is the concept of praise. Everyone loves to be praised for the work they, but only if it is genuine and not backhanded. The textbook talks about how praise can be great unless it is turned into a controlling phrase. The professor does this several times to him and one time of note is in his office with Will when the equation he solves is burned up by the cigarette. He tells Will that he HAS to put his talent to use and that he SHOULDN'T waste a gift. This phrase is praise because he is telling him how smart he is and he later tells him he could change the world. This sentiment is not seen by Will because all he sees is the controlling manner of the professor telling him what he has to do. This undermines the praise and also preys on Will's large sense of autonomy. Sean takes Will's intellect and praises him in an extrinsically motivating way. He explains to him that he is bound by nothing and that the world is his and nobody can tell him what to do. Will replies that there is honor in the lowliest jobs and the professor replies with the the idea that there is no honor in keeping talent away from the world. This hits Will hard because it is praise that is very extrinsically motivating for him and eventually turned into self-determined intrinsic motivation.

The next idea that I found was that Will needs a sense of relatedness. He refuses the help of every therapist because none of them treat him like a person, but rather just another patient. This becomes very clear when Sean begins to tell Will that he can know everything in the world, but he will never know what it is like to experience it. He knows about Michelangelo but has never smelled the Sistine Chapel. It is then that Sean tells Will that he can't know what it is like to be an orphan just by reading Oliver Twist. This brings Will in close for relatedness and eventually they both share their stories of abusive fathers and Will finds that he has that in common with someone he can trust and relate to and his need for the relatedness is filled.

Will's final example from our text is his need for psychological achievement. He is very troubled and very disturbed. Clearly he is very brilliant and a great problem solver. However, he has never been able to solve the problems that are going on inside his own brain. He sets up several barriers like his smart-ass remarks and his ability to change the subject so quick it is hard to make a comment about anything. It is only when he opens of to Sean that he is able to tell his story and listen to the Sean about why he is here and what his life means. He eventually tells him that none of his abuse was his fault and that is the day that good Will Hunting finds psychological achievement and starts his on the path to his new life.

Terms Used: Autonomy, competence, praise, self-determined intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, relatedness, Psychological achievement, barriers.

The movie Good Will Hunting displayed intrinsic and extrinsic motivation as well as high and low needs for achievement. Will was intrinsically motivated to solve the math problem that was written on the chalk board. He was the janitor so he was in the school when no one else was and solved the equation and did not come forward that he was the one who solved it. He did not want recognition for solving the problem; he simply wanted to solve it for himself. Will is also clearly intrinsically motivated to read a lot of literature because he is obviously very familiar with a lot of famous works when he is at the bar and won a verbal argument with a Harvard student. Will said it is pointless to spend a lot of money on a college education when you can just get knowledge from the library. This showed his disapproval of the extrinsic motivation of a college.
Another character that displayed internal motivation was Will’s therapist Sean. Sean had gone to college with Professor Lambeau but his life achievements were nowhere near the prestige of Professor Lambeau’s. Sean reveals that it is not awards or prestige that matter to him, but the time spent with his wife is what he was truly passionate about. This was something that he was intrinsically motivated by and he was not as influenced by the extrinsic motivation of career success.
A conflict arose when Professor Lambeau tried to extrinsically motivate Will to do math and attend therapy. Will was basically forced to do both of those things or he would be facing jail time. This was extrinsic motivation which made him unmotivated and not desiring to perform well. Will displayed this when he drove away all the therapists because he did not want to meet with one. Also when Will sent his friend to the job interview Lambeau set up for him because he didn’t want to go and he didn’t want a job. This was upsetting to Lambeau, but Will did not want to do things that he was not intrinsically motivated to do.
The social need for achievement was displayed in this movie. Will had a low need for achievement. He did not desire status, he simply wanted to go about his life unnoticed. This was contrasted by Lambeau’s high need for achievement. Lambeau was a brilliant mathematician and he received a prestigious award for his accomplishment. Lambeau desired for will to have the same need for achievement because he saw his potential to achieve even greater things for himself. This is where their characters really clashed. Lambeau also desired power and that was seen in his relationship with Sean and wanting to be dominant over him, and have more control over Will.
Will also showed a low achievement when it came to relationships. Will seemed to fall under the tendency to avoid failure when it came to Skylar. He enjoyed being with her but when it got serious he backed off because he was afraid of failure, and afraid that if she really knew him and got close then she would not want to be with him. He ended up letting her leave and didn’t express his true feeling towards her until the end of the movie.
Terms: Intrinsic, Extrinsic, motivation, status, power, achievement, tendency to avoid failure, control

First off, I would like to mention that I forgot how good of a movie Good Will Hunting is. Even though the movie is sort of old, it kept me very interested.
Will really has no autonomy in the beginning of the movie. He has no self-direction or goal in his life, he has no idea of what “he” wants to do. Will is ruled by the momentum of his life. Ever since he was a child he has been controlled by his environment and has never been able or taken the initiative to create a different life for himself. So, instead of getting out of his current life he sticks with it because that’s all he knows. Obviously, Will is searching for something more in his life. That can explain why he ends up at MIT as a janitor. This is where the tide begins to change for him.
Will has some intense psychological needs. A need for knowledge is the most prominent need that he has. Will constantly reads and solves everything in sight. Intrinsically motivated, Will tries to learn everything he can. Will finds this fun and seeks to do it without receiving any kind of reward and with what seems to him as little effort put forth to do so.
Will has been at the mercy of social needs his whole life. Deprived of intimacy, he relies solely on affiliation needs which he gets from his friends. As an orphan, Will received little love if any. Basically, he is numb to intimate relationships and turns to avoidance behavior whenever it gets close to him. This can be shown when he meets various therapists including Sean. Will also tries to escape when his relationship with Skylar gets serious. Chuckie, his best friend, along with his other pals, provide a brotherhood that allows Will to feel a part of something. This satisfies his affiliation need. His friends provide him with security and he knows that they will be loyal to him whatever happens, unlike the people that have been in Wills’ life in the past.
Wills’ life really starts to get turned upside down when he is facing jail time for getting into a fight with an old enemy. Will is now given various incentives and is extrinsically motivated to do what is asked of him in order to stay out of jail. A possible incentive could be that Will gets to stay out of jail and another is that he gets to see Skylar. Another could be that he gets to practice his mathematical skills at a prestigious school with a highly skilled professor. An extrinsic motivation would be therapy which Will sees as a complete joke and unnecessary but he must do it in order to remain a free man.
By practically being forced into therapy, Will is forced to become intimate with his therapist, Sean. This results in anger at first but then he finally sees the light as does Sean. They both have deep issues and needed each other to figure themselves out. Once Sean and Will have their breakthrough, Will realizes his Love for Skylar and proceeds to have an intimate relationship with her. Chuck has a large portion to do with Wills’ realization. Everything else has been made clear to Will and all he needs is that last little push which is bluntly provided by Chuck. Chuck lets Will know that not only would he be wasting his god given talent but he would be bringing shame to his coworkers if he continued to work there. Chuck isn’t trying to be mean to him, he just wants what’s best for his friend. Chuck instills a sense of achievement in Will. Will then decides to have a higher need of achievement and pursue some of the greater things in life such as a job and a life with Skylar.
Despite the many different issues that are made visible with Will throughout the movie, there is actually a lot of other interpersonal battles going on within the heads of different characters within the movie. Sean is battling a fight with the fact that he lost the love of his life, his wife. Sean is intrinsically motivated to help Will because he sees a lot of himself in Will. Helping Will out helps him figure himself out. Sean is extrinsically motivated to work as a professor. It’s clear that he has no will at that point to teach, he just has to in order to pay the bills. In the end he realizes this and takes some time off to travel and find himself. Prof. Gerald Lambeau also hits the wall mentally. His whole life he has been at the tip of mathematical excellence and then some kid comes along and makes it all look so easy. Gerald feels like a failure and wishes he never met Will. His need for achievement drops and he feels incompetent when it comes to his profession. Gerald recovers well and realizes that it’s alright if he isn’t the best. He proceeds to help Will succeed even though Will has treated him terribly. Gerald also reconciles his relationship with Sean which helps both of their affiliation needs.

Terms: Autonomy, Psychological needs, Intrinsic motivation, Social needs, Intimacy, Affiliation, Avoidance behavior, Incentives, Extrinsic motivation, Achievement, and Competence.

Good WIll Hunting is one of my favorite movies! I was so excited this was one of the movies to analyze, it is perfect to show examples of these concepts. This movie shows things such as extrinsic/intrinsic motivation to psychological needs to social needs.

As one of the most known scenes from this movie, at the beginning when Will solved the problem at MIT in secret. Will had no desire to tell anyone about how smart he was, or how easy difficult, almost impossible, math problems came so easily. This shows that he is intrinsically motivated, he did it for pleasure. This scene also gives example to the belief that I feel Will had a high need for competence. He wanted to be good at something, just for fun. There were no incentives, no outside reason besides enjoyment of mastering a skill. I would say that in this part of the movie, it is a mastery goal. He sneaks around the most prestigous technical college to do math problems, that many of the professors take years to do. He wants to get better and for no outside reason. Another example of Will's high need for competence is in the bar with Chuckie and his friends. This Harvard student decideds to try and put Chuckie down with all of his "smart talk" about every book he's learned. Will stands up and starts talking about everything he knows that counters the young man only repeating books. Will continues to tell the man his opinions and that he cannot even think for himself. Will shows that he has a high need for knowing things, understanding topics and applying them, not just reciting books.

Will shows that he is looking for achievment, he is trying to find it, but his avoidence motivation gets in the way. His fear of failure drives him to change his behavior, to pull away from getting to close to people. This is what he does with Skylar when she starts to get to know him and understand him more. He has been abused, abanded, and pushed around his whole life, he has learned to fade away or fight. Will has a desire to be with others to create long relationships, but his fear makes him tense causing him to push away. Will does this with Sean in the beginning trying to manipulate him like he does with the earlier psychologists. WIll scores low on his intimacy needs, he has been left, rejeceted, lack of caring and concern, no warmth or emotional connectedness and an immense lack of love. When he meets Skylar, he doesn't really know how to love her. When she wants him to come with her to California because she loves him, he doesn't know how to react besides leaving. He doesn't want to fele that abondonment that he felt before. Sean shows him that it is not his fault, and that he deserves to be successful and to be loved.

Sean is an autonomy supportive motivator. He wants what Will wants. Jerry wants Will to teach or work in big government jobs. He thinks its best for Will and he would make a lot of money. Jerry thinks that Will just needs a push to move forward with his career, even though Will doesn't know what he wants. Will thinks he wants to stay and do construction becuase someone has to and it is helpful to the people who need it. In the scene where Sean and Jerry are out to lunch both arguing about what they believe is best for Will. Sean stresses that Will needs to chose for himself, that Jerry cannot force or push any choices on Will, becuase he will push away. Sean wants Will to be happy with his choices, and throughout their mettings Sean stresses that Will make choices. Starting with talking in the first couple of sessions. Will didn't want to talk, so Sean waited until he chose to talk to him. Sean wants Will to choose what he wants to do with his life.

Will shows autonomy in one of the last scenes where he leaves a note in Sean's mailbox saying that he couldn't take the government job, he had to "see about a girl" This is finally what Will wanted. It was his own choice, not Chuckie's, not Jerry's, his own. Chuckie wanted Will to get out of that place and to make somehting of himself, because he had the option and Chuckie did not. Jerry didn't want Will's talent to go to waste, and Will had no idea what he wanted for the longest time until Sean finally worked choice into Will's mind. Will was able to show true autonomy when making a decision truly his own.

Terms: extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation, psychological needs, incentives, competnece, mastery goal, achievment, avoidance motivation, intimacy needs, autonomy-supportive motivator, autonomy

The movie, “Good Will Hunting” gives excellent examples of many of the concepts found in our textbook. After watching it I found there were instances of both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation was apparent when Will chose to solve the difficult mathematical problems without any external rewards or outside motivators. He simply did the problems for his own pleasure, or possibly to satisfy his own competence need. In doing this, Will also achieved mastery of the skill he has set out to accomplish.

I think power had a great deal to do with this movie. Will, having grown up disadvantaged as an abused orphan, was pushed around, put down, and made to feel weak. As he got older, he began to express his strong need for power by fighting. This was shown when Will convinced his best friend Chuckie to stop the car so he and the other three friends could beat up a group of men which included the one guy who had beat Will up when he was in kindergarten. I could tell that because of his position growing up, Will tried to take advantage of every opportunity to hold a power position over others, leading to a possible rise in self-esteem and confidence. Another example of Will striving to gain power over someone else is the confrontation in the bar with the “Harvard plagiarist”. The college student obviously isn’t as smart as he claims to be and is put in his place by Will, who again gains the spotlight.

Another aspect of the film semi-related to the need for power is the fact that Will has been socialized by abusers, causing him to use violence to gain respect and to problem-solve life events. Also because of this socialization, Will internalizes his need for achievement. He acts like it’s not important to solve mathematical problems that only he and a few people in the population are able to do.
Will displays a strong need for relatedness, as he is shown with the same three buddies on a daily basis. As a child he was abandoned, so he feels the need to be surrounded by those who he knows won’t leave him. They are his security blanket, so to speak. He trusts them, which Will does not do easily due to his rough upbringing. When it came to Professor Lambeau, Will displayed mistrust at first. This was especially clear when the professor mussed Will’s hair in an affectionate way, causing Will to look sharply at him with shock. Will seemed to have a huge problem with intimacy as well. Not only did he try to keep every counselor at bay with his crazy tactics and sarcastic demeanor, but he attempted to push away the one person who had grown to love him. Although I feel that Will did long for the intimacy with Skylar, as well as others, his trust issues were too strong at first for him to overcome. Professor Lambeau claimed Will was a genius, but very defensive, and needed someone who could get through to him.

This brings me to the extrinsic motivation the professor tried repeatedly to use to get Will to take jobs which would end up giving the professor himself some tenure for his “discovery”. He kept trying to convince Will that his gift should be shared, and that he was special, he would have high status and make lots of money doing what few people could do.
Another example of intrinsic motivation is when Skylar tells Will she does not want the answers to her homework simply because she wants to learn the information. She must realize that if she gave in and got the answers from Will, she could get rewards such as more free time to have fun and an easy grade without doing the work. Instead Skylar chooses to master the homework herself, gaining competence.

Lastly, Will is pushed by his counselor Sean to utilize his autonomy, decide what he wants out of life for himself, and do things because he wants to not because he is told to. He eventually learns this as we see at the end of the film when he turns down the job for the girl. In doing that, Will also fulfills his need for intimacy he has been suppressing.

This was a very good movie (I hadn’t seen it before) with a lot of emotion and discovery. Robin Williams' part was excellent.

TERMS: intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, rewards, competence, autonomy, relatedness, intimacy, power, mastery, socialization

I thought that Will had a strong social need for affiliation: a big part of his self-identity was that he was a working-class kid from south Boston (an area where there are strong social and ethnic communities). His friends were probably people he had known most of his life. It must have been awkward for him to be ‘different’ from them: he didn’t want to be labeled a bookworm or egghead and cast aside. Also, being an orphan, Will was probably afraid of losing the only close social ties he had ever known. And so, he hid his abilities away and tried to fit in by acting like even more of a street-tough punk than his friends did, trying to prove that he belonged.

The scene where Will and his friends stop to give a beat down to the Italian kids was an example of this: Will beats the kid he is fighting viciously, much more savagely than his friends were doing. He also swears a great deal throughout the movie, another way to disguise his intelligence and fit in with his friends. Such a strong group identity (revealing socio-organizational and affective commitment) is distinguished (and perhaps propagated) by an ‘us/them’ perspective: an attitude that originates in in-group/out-group distinctions, where in-group members are leery of out-group members, and where one’s social position is determined by how well one conforms to the values of the group (in this case, being a rough and tumble, hard-fighting and hard-drinking working-class stiff).

I don’t think that this is an uncommon situation for lower-class, blue-collar people -- especially those with a strong ethnic identity tied to fighting and drinking. (It is not just Will, in the film: when Lambeau -- trying to track Will down -- goes to the Building & Grounds shop, the maintenance staff treats him with disdain; and when Chuckie suggests that they go to a new bar near Harvard, he exhorts, “We’ll fuck up some smart kids!”) It is an environment (in the movies, at least) where many people feel that ‘street smarts’ are superior to ‘book smarts’ (a prime example of the ‘Us’ vs. ‘Them’ mentality).

I come from a very similar background myself (right down to being sent off to a couple of aunts in south Boston once or twice), and some of these things seem very familiar and ‘normal’ to me.

I thought that Will also had a strong psychological need for autonomy: he did not want to be pushed into anything he did not want to do (e.g., obeying the rules, adhering to the conditions of his parole, cooperating with the psychologists). He wanted to feel like he was making his own choices. An example of this is when he remains silent during his second meeting with Sean; as Sean explains to Lambeau, this was “To show that he doesn’t have to talk to me if he doesn’t want to.” Ironically, however, Will was actually depriving himself of choices, by simply conforming to a stereotype rather than living his life authentically.

Part of this stems from Will’s superiority complex. He didn’t think that anyone else could possibly be his equal: he probably had limited expectations of his friends (they would have his back, but would never know the ‘real’ him), and held all other people at arm’s length, to avoid being hurt or disappointed (pain avoiding behavior). He reacted negatively -- and with open hostility -- to anyone who presented themselves as intellectuals (e.g., the poser grad student in the bar, the first five psychologists, Prof. Gerald Lambeau).

Even when he met Skylar, he was (as explained by Sean) torn between wanting to be with her and the fear of her not living up to the ‘perfect’ image of her he had in his head. (As Will himself confirmed, “Right now she's perfect; I don't want to ruin that.”) This, and many of Will’s other actions, fits Atkinson’s ‘pain-avoiding’ model of behavior from chapter 7.

It’s funny, because even though Will apparently thinks himself superior to others, he is disdainful of others who do the exact same thing (Lambeau, the other psychologists, the grad student in the bar). Will, the most manipulative character in the film, calls everyone else out on their defenses in order to maintain his own.

But even though he is an intellectual, Sean is able to gain Will’s trust and respect: by disclosing his background, by demonstrating that he is just as strong and tough as Will, by disclosing that he lifts free weights (and benches more than Will, it seems), and finally -- like a scene from a prison movie -- by grabbing Will by the throat and slamming him into a wall. (And even when he is trying to maintain his professional demeanor, Sean addresses Will as ‘Sport’ in an aggressive tone.) Sean had to show that he had the same original affiliation as Will, in order for Will to recognize him as a peer and start dealing with him in an authentic way.

(Sean waves a big red flag alerting the viewer to his role in the film in his first scene, where, during a lecture, he asks, “Why is trust the most important component in making a breakthrough with a client?” It is clear from that point on that Sean must open Will up to trusting others -- and so, to the love that would give him a true sense of affiliation and intimacy. Aww!)

Terms: strong social need, affiliation, self-identity, psychological need, autonomy, in-group, out-group, authentic, pain-avoiding model of behavior, breakthrough, superiority complex, intimacy

I had never seen this whole movie, so I was excited to finally have the excuse to watch it. The scene I chose to use for my analysis was the scene in which the professor and Sean argue about Will. Sean defends Will and is looking out for his well-being. The professor is not. He states that Will needs to do something with his life so he doesn’t become washed up. The professor does not seem to care about why Will does not want to a job or even about what Will wants at all. Sean brings up Will’s needs for intimacy, reciprocity, and belonging. He tries to explain to the professor why Will is acting the way he is. The professor does not seem to care about what he is saying and focuses solely on his desired outcome.

The professor is not aware that Will is intrinsically motivated to solve the problems he is presented with. Will understands, or “gets,” the problems, and is able to solve them quickly. This demonstrates his competence. Will also enjoys his autonomy and volition. A job would violate his sense of freedom. Also, with a job, he would be expected to meet certain requirements and his autonomy would be limited. When the professor introduced a job as an option, Will was turned off because his intrinsic motivation was being undermined. The money was offered as an external motivator, but it did not motivate Will, so he did not accept a job position. Will gains a sense of self-worth from being able to solve the challenging math problems. The professor was also trying to control Will’s behaviors. He tried to pressure him into accepting a job offer. He was not supportive of Will’s needs or desires. Further proof that the professor was trying to control Will’s behavior can be seen through his reliance on the external motivator of money.

On the other hand, Sean was autonomy supportive. He defended Will and took his affect and point of view into account. He acknowledged and accepted Will’s negative affect and overall lack of emotion. He took the time to understand why Will was the way he was. Will was lacking a sense of relatedness in his life. He did not have much positive interaction with anyone besides his friends. He had high-quality relationships with his friends because they cared for, valued, and accepted each other. Also, there was a sense of reciprocity in their relationships. They supported one another and spent a lot of time together. If these friends had not been meeting Will’s needs for relatedness, he would have ended their friendships. As it was, Will clung to his friends because they were his only source of intimacy and love.

Will had a high need of achievement because he needed to show his competence. Affiliation and power were not big social needs for Will. He did not care about either one. Will had a high social need for intimacy but had trouble finding that intimacy. He pushed people away before they had the chance to push him away. He surrounded himself with his friends because they were loyal and had proved to Will that they would stick around. He felt secure in his relationships with them. Will was abandoned by his family and was an orphan. He was continually abused and did not receive reciprocal love while growing up. He found his friends, and stuck with them ever since.

Will came to trust Sean. Sean had gotten past his barriers and had touched something in Will. Will became aware of his tendency to push others away. Sean recognized what Will needed and proceeded to tell him that his past was not his fault. Will rejected Sean’s words, but Sean persisted. Will said, “Not you.” This signifies his trust in Sean. Will dreaded Sean leaving him. Eventually, Will gave in and embraced Sean. He felt like Sean understood him and greatly appreciates the help he has given him. Sean gave Will the affection that he had been lacking. Will comes to admire Sean and highly regards his opinion. Overall, this movie was a great example of many motivational and emotional concepts.

Terms: intrinsic motivation, competence, autonomy, volition, external motivator, relatedness, reciprocity, intimacy, achievement, belonging, trust, affection, social needs, autonomy-supportive

The movie Good Will Hunting gave many great examples for the material the class read and discussed over chapters 5-7. Will Hunting is a genius, but doesn’t care to brag about his extensive knowledge and he personally chooses to read many books just to learn, and chooses to work through the proof that Professor Lambeau had up on his chalkboard, but he tries to avoid getting any recognition for his skill. Thus, Will shows that he is intrinsically motivated. Intrinsic motivation is when a person naturally engages in their interests and exercises their capacity to seek out and master optimal challenges. Will chooses to engage in those activities because he’s simply interested in them and he feels satisfaction in doing them without any recognition or incentive to encourage him to read all those books or work through math problems.
Also, Will has a high need for autonomy. Autonomy is the psychological need to experience self-direction and personal endorsement in the initiation and regulation of one’s behavior. Will is someone that must feel like he has a choice in what he gets to do and must have a sense of volition. One can see this when Will refuses to take the various job offers that Lambeau is setting him up with, and states that he’s fine with working simple, minimum wage jobs, even though he’s brilliant. One can also see Will exercising his need for autonomy when he’s forced to start therapy because he acts stubborn says he doesn’t need it. Then once Will starts seeing Sean, he feels like he has freedom because Sean waits for him to start the conversation, giving him a sense of control of what they are going to discuss.
The psychological need for competence is also seen throughout the movie by Lambeau multiple times, and he is someone who has a high need for competency. Competence is the need to have effective interactions with the environment, and it reflects the desire to exercise one’s capacities and skills and, in doing so, to seek out and master optimal challenges. Lambeau likes to be seen as a brilliant person and isn’t afraid to boast about the fact that he is a Field’s Medal winner and that he has worked through difficult proofs and problems in the academic world. One can also see his high need for competency when he is fighting with Sean and he makes the remark that Sean is jealous of his success, and that Sean feels like he is a failure. Although, one can also see Lambeau’s need for competency feel threatened when he admits to Will that he wishes Will never came along because Will has the ability to work through proofs that took him years to figure out.
Another need that was seen in Good Will Hunting was the need for affiliation. The need for affiliation is rooted in a fear of interpersonal rejection. It can also be seen as the need of approval, acceptance, and security in relationships with other people. Due to Will’s past abuse throughout his youth he feels that it is difficult to open up and be honest with Skylar, so he chooses to lie about the past, thus showing he has a low need for affiliation in that relationship. However, Will does have a high need of affiliation when it come to his relationship with his three friends because he knows that they have his back, like when they got into that fight, and at the end of the movie they buy him a car for his birthday.
Intrinsic motivation, autonomy, competency, and affiliation are just a few examples from chapters 5-7 that were discussed in class and were read in the book which I was able visualize while I watched Good Will Hunting. Overall, I really enjoyed watching this movie and I felt that it helped me understand what was discussed in class and what I read in chapters 5-7.


Terms Used: intrinsic motivation, psychological needs, motivations, incentives, autonomy, self-direction, volition, control, competence, affiliation, avoidance

I saw many concepts in Good Will Hunting that I feel are worth discussing and the first would be Will’s intrinsic motivation. Will was a janitor at MIT, which was a forty-minute commute from his house. As it was stated by his therapist in the movie “you can be a janitor anywhere, why ride the train for forty minutes to do it at the most prestigious technical school in the world?” That was a very good question by his therapist because it related to his intrinsic motivation. What really drove his behavior? It wasn’t the money because he could work at the construction site with his best friend and get paid just as much. It can’t be seen in the movie but we can assume that Will took great pleasure from working at MIT and being among the most brilliant men and woman of the world. Intrinsic motivation is defined as the tendency to engage one’s interests and to exercise one’s capacities and this is exactly what Will did in the movie. He was interested in the work of these professors and students so he took a job where he could be surrounded by their work.
Another example of intrinsic motivation that I saw throughout the movie was his reasons for reading so many books. He was quite possibly the most intelligent man in the United States in this movie and it came with no formal training. He could quote textbooks like it was something that he learned in third grade and I spent a little time asking myself why someone would read so many books. Will was not enrolled in college, didn’t have a high skill job, and wasn’t getting paid to read the books so why do it. There was no extrinsic motivation to make him read the books. The only answer I had to this question was he was intrinsically motivated. Something inside of him drove him to read so many books because he found it interesting or challenging.

Another important concept of motivation and emotion that I saw in the movie was that of power. Power is defined as the desire to make the physical and social world conform to one’s personal image. I saw several instances of Will’s sense of power at work in the movie and I feel like the playground scene was quite important. In this particular scene, Will and his friends beat up a guy that Will knew in kindergarten. The only reasoning behind this decision was that this kid beat Will up in kindergarten. Now, 15 or so years later, Will is in a position where he can regain the control of the situation. So he and his friends beat the living crap out of this innocent man and Will gets sent to jail. Was it worth it to do such a thing? I really can’t tell you what Will was thinking in this scene, but it can pretty much be said that he wanted this man to know that he will no longer be taken for granted.
Aggressiveness seems to go hand in hand with power and that too was evident in this scene. Aggression is often used as a means for involving and satisfying power needs and studies show that men high in power strivings get into more arguments and participate in violence. That is exactly what happened in this scene because the situation could have been resolved by an exchange of words rather than a playground brawl.

Affiliation and relatedness seem to be related concepts in this movie. Affiliation is described as establishing, maintaining, or restoring a positive relationship with another person. Relatedness is the psychological need to establish close emotional bonds and attachments with other people. Both of these terms are present throughout the entire movie. Will has three close friends that support his decisions and want what is best for him. Will also enjoyed his time with them and he stood up for them when they needed it. Its hard to say how Will would have acted if he didn’t have these friends to fulfill his needs of affiliation and relatedness but it is safe to say that the story would have turned out quite differently.

Autonomy is present throughout the entire movie and Will has a very strong need for autonomy. Autonomy is basically doing what you what when you want. That is Will in a nutshell. He did what he pleased, said what he wanted, and lived his life the way he saw fit. This of course changed throughout the movie as Will took on more responsibilities and as Lambeau started to guide him down the right path. Lambeau arranged job interviews, made him go to a therapist, and made him solve math problems. Will fought Lambeau at first but near the end of the movie he broke down because he lost his sense of power.

Intrinsic motivation, behavior, extrinsic motivation, power, aggressiveness, affiliation, relatedness, autonomy

One of the first examples from the book I thought about when watching Good Will Hunting was the psychological need of competence. The book defines competence as "the psychological need to be effective in interactions with the environment, and it reflects the desire to exercise one's capacities and skill and, in doing so, to seek out and master optimal challenges."
A demonstration of the first part of this definition is played out when Will is out at the Harvard bar with his buddies and a "wise guy" from Harvard tries to make Chuckie (Ben Affleck) look bad when he's talking to Skylar and her friend. Will steps in to defend him and save face with his vast knowledge of American history and literature. He is demonstrating his need to be effective in interactions with his environment. He succeeds by making the guy look bad in front of the girls and also successfully defends his friend and their reputation as a group.
Another obvious demonstration of this definition is when Will solves the equations on the board in the hallway. He is intrigued by them and displays a desire to 'exercise his capacities and skills'. When an even more difficult equation is placed on the board he again solves it. It is not until he is 'discovered' and ordered to work with Professor Lambeau that he seeks out and masters optimal challenges. With every equation Lambeau throws his way he completes it with ease and is always looking for something more challenging.
Will was very intrinsically motivated in the beginning to complete the equations but as time went on and he was required to do them he began to get burnt out and the satisfaction of completing the equations and being praised for it took a toll on his intrinsic motivation. The book discussed how receiving reward for something that you are usually intrinsically motivated to do or simply enjoy doing can weaken that motivation. This is exactly what happened to Will.
If I were to rate Will on the three social needs highlighted in chapter 7 I would say he is low in achievement, moderate to high in power, and moderate to high in affiliation and intimacy. Although Will is an extremely bright individual with all the options in the world he does not seem to want to grasp his gift and do something with it. Everyone around him; Professor Lambeau, Sean, his friends, and even Skylar, can't seem to understand why he is squandering his gift away and not using it to its full potential. To Will, he would be satisfied working a blue collar job the rest of his life and never leaving the neighborhood he grew up in.
As far as power, Will likes to be in control at all times. Whether he is telling off a guy in the bar, smooth talking a judge, messing with a therapist, or completing his girlfriend's homework so they can hang out, he is always the one calling the shots. It is not until the end of the movie that he starts relinquishing some of his power and control and begins to open up to Sean and Skylar. Both of these instances seem to happen on his own time as well.
When it comes to affiliation and intimacy you can tell from the beginning that this is a strong motivator for Will. It begins with his friends. He has known them his whole life and would stand up for any of them in a heartbeat. He is always seeking to maintain his solid relationships with the guys and even after arguments or disagreements they always restore their friendship back to its solid foundation. Another example of this is with Skylar. Immediately upon meeting her he seeks to develop a positive relationship with her. In the end of the movie this relationship is in fact, the greatest motivator to get Will out of Boston and to potentially capitalize on his gift. When Will leaves to "go see about a girl" he is sacrificing his need for power and letting his need for intimacy determine his future.
Terms: psychological needs, competence, intrinsic motivator, social needs, achievement, affiliation and intimacy, power

I have to say that I loved this movie. It was my first time watching it, but like all great movies it captured the essence of human nature. The film depicts a young man, Will Hunting, who is intellectually gifted but is troubled by his past and has no direction for his future. Will faces many obstacles in the film, including a lack of challenges and an aversion to intimacy with his girlfriend, Skylar. I will briefly describe a scene and then examine what motivational concepts were displayed in each.

The movie begins with a scene in a classroom in MIT. Professor Lambeau, who is a well-known mathematician, tells his class that he will put a problem on the board and that any student that can solve it will be given the chance to work with him. Will Hunting, who is a janitor in that particular building, sees the problem on the board and solves it. In this relatively short scene, multiple motivational concepts are displayed. Professor Lambeau is offering an incentive to his students to solve the difficult theorem by offering a perceived reward, which is having the privilege to work with a well-known scholar. While extrinsic motivation such as those techniques can increase the wanted behavior, it can actually reduce the intrinsic motivation of the student. Will Hunting, on the other hand, has a lot of intrinsic motivation when it comes to solving difficult problems. This motivation is probably derived from a psychological need for competence, or mastery of a particular skill. Due to his high level of competence need, he does not need the incentive in order to complete the task.

The next scene of was the break-up scene between Will and Skylar. When Skylar asks Will to go with her to California, Will responds with hesitance and withdraws from her. When Skylar reaches out to him, Will only shuts her out further and tells her that he does not love her and leaves. This scene is important because it demonstrates wills aversion to intimacy. This aversion is probably due to his troubled past because he has learned to associated pain and hurt with close, intimate relationships. The consequence of his abusive childhood is that Will is unable to put down his barriers to form an intimate relationship with Skylar. Because intimacy is a social need, multiple aspects of one’s life, including developmental influences, cognitive influences, and socialization influences, influence it. From his environment, Will has learned to not form close, intimate relationships with other people because he is likely to get hurt. Luckily, Will is later able to face the demons from his past and allow himself to take a chance on his relationship with Skylar.

The last scene I will analyze was the dramatic scene in Professor Lambeau’s office where Will burns the theorem that they had been working on. This scene was significant because it highlighted the differences between Will and Lambeau. While Will is gifted and the answers come naturally to him, Professor Lambeau has to work for the answers and struggles with some of the problems that come to Will effortlessly. It seems that because Will is not challenged by the problems put before him he not motivated to solve them. In order for flow to be achieved, Will needs to be faced with optimal challenges, which is well beyond that of a normal human being. Since Will is not being optimally challenged, it seems that he is not getting as much psychological benefit by completing the tasks but rather sees it as a burden. On the other hand, Professor Lambeau is extremely upset with Will because he has been given a gift that he sees is being wasted. He tells Will that, “most days, I wish I never met you.” While Will seems to be motivated by competence, Lambeau seems to be motivated by achievement, or recognition by his peers for his accomplishments such as the medal he received. Fundamentally, the two men are getting their motivation from two different sources: one from the internal (Will) and the other from the external (Lambeau). Ultimately, Will decides what is most important to him is not the same as what is important to his mentor. Will decides that his need for intimacy (or his relationship with Skylar) is more important than his need for achievement (or a successful career as a mathematician). His therapist, Sean, helps him see that in order to be truly happy, it is best to follow one’s heart and seek out the things that are intrinsically motivating rather than was is deemed important by everyone else.

Terms: incentive, reward, extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation, psychological need, competence, intimacy, consequence, social need, flow, optimal challenges, achievement

The movie Good Will Hunting displayed intrinsic and extrinsic motivation as well as high and low needs for achievement. Will was intrinsically motivated to solve the math problem that was written on the chalk board. He was the janitor so he was in the school when no one else was and solved the equation and did not come forward that he was the one who solved it. He did not want recognition for solving the problem; he simply wanted to solve it for himself. Will is also clearly intrinsically motivated to read a lot of literature because he is obviously very familiar with a lot of famous works when he is at the bar and won a verbal argument with a Harvard student. Will said it is pointless to spend a lot of money on a college education when you can just get knowledge from the library. This showed his disapproval of the extrinsic motivation of a college.
Another character that displayed internal motivation was Will’s therapist Sean. Sean had gone to college with Professor Lambeau but his life achievements were nowhere near the prestige of Professor Lambeau’s. Sean reveals that it is not awards or prestige that matter to him, but the time spent with his wife is what he was truly passionate about. This was something that he was intrinsically motivated by and he was not as influenced by the extrinsic motivation of career success.
A conflict arose when Professor Lambeau tried to extrinsically motivate Will to do math and attend therapy. Will was basically forced to do both of those things or he would be facing jail time. This was extrinsic motivation which made him unmotivated and not desiring to perform well. Will displayed this when he drove away all the therapists because he did not want to meet with one. Also when Will sent his friend to the job interview Lambeau set up for him because he didn’t want to go and he didn’t want a job. This was upsetting to Lambeau, but Will did not want to do things that he was not intrinsically motivated to do.
The social need for achievement was displayed in this movie. Will had a low need for achievement. He did not desire status, he simply wanted to go about his life unnoticed. This was contrasted by Lambeau’s high need for achievement. Lambeau was a brilliant mathematician and he received a prestigious award for his accomplishment. Lambeau desired for will to have the same need for achievement because he saw his potential to achieve even greater things for himself. This is where their characters really clashed. Lambeau also desired power and that was seen in his relationship with Sean and wanting to be dominant over him, and have more control over Will.
Will also showed a low achievement when it came to relationships. Will seemed to fall under the tendency to avoid failure when it came to Skylar. He enjoyed being with her but when it got serious he backed off because he was afraid of failure, and afraid that if she really knew him and got close then she would not want to be with him. He ended up letting her leave and didn’t express his true feeling towards her until the end of the movie.
Terms: Intrinsic, Extrinsic, motivation, status, power, achievement, tendency to avoid failure, control

The first time I saw this movie, I simply thought it just a good movie. However, after watching the movie with psychological needs in mind, I am now think it is a great film. This film shows a variety of different needs and how they affect the everyday lives of people who are not having their needs met.
One of the greatest examples of a psychological need throughout the entire movie is Will’s need for autonomy. This is shown very clearly when one looks at the choices Will is making. The first time this became apparent in the fight scene. Will sees a man who used to beat him up while he and his friends are at a little league game. Will does nothing besides pointing him out to his friends. Later, he corners the man and beats him up in a deserted basketball court. I felt he made the choice to wait so that he could justify his choice to himself.
For Will, life is all about being able to do whatever you want whenever you want. This is noticeable when you look at the struggle he had when Gerry pushed him to get a “real job”. At the begging of the movie, Will is working a low level janitorial job. This job requires very little from him and would be very easy for him to walk away from. By not being attached to his job, his only motivation for working is his decision to come into work. This reinforces his personal autonomy.
When Will is with Skyler, he feels more quasi-needs because of his desire to impress him. This is shown when it becomes apparent that he doesn’t want Skyler to see his house. Skyler makes Will feel the need to be better than what he currently is. Skyler appears to be the only extrinct motivation that affects Will.
Will’s relationship with Skyler threatens his autonomy because he starts thinking about what she wants, instead of only what he does. Skyler needs to go to California and asks Will to go with her. She asks him to go with her because Will fulfills her personal need for intimacy. This need scares Will because he has never acknowledged his own need for intimacy. Since he feels threated, Will ends his relationship with Skyler.
One of the things that drives Will is his fear of failure. Will chooses to avoid certain challenges with certain behaviors that don’t give him the option of failure. By staying at a job that is not challenging and breaking up with Skyler, he removes the chance that he may fail.
His relationship with Skyler is repaired after Will comes to terms with his own social needs. This happens in Sean’s office, when Sean tells Will repeatedly that “It’s not your fault.” Hearing this helps will realize his own personal need for affiliation. By recognizing this social need, he is able to accept his feelings for Skyler.
One the main themes throughout the entire movie is how important it is to recognize your personal needs and how they affect your life.
Terms: psychological needs, autonomy, reinforces, motivation, intimacy, failure, behaviors, affiliation, social needs, quasi-needs, extrinct motivation,

The movie, Good Will Hunting, had many concepts from the text book, especially in the psychological and social needs. Will worked as a janitor at M.I.T. and a mathematics professor would write equations on a board in the hallway for his students to try to figure it out. When Will was working, he saw the equation and solved the question. Will did not need to answer the question, he was not told to answer it, but he did so otherwise. Will answered the question because of his autonomy. Will self-determined to answer the question because it interested him. There were many other examples of autonomy shown in this movie. In the scene where Skylar and Will are at an outside cafe, Skylar is doing her organic chemistry and she is concentrating hard so she will be able to understand it. Will said that he has dabbled into doing some organic chemistry. This blew Skylar's mind and she said, "nobody does it for fun." Will must have found it interesting for him to do it. Sean, the psychologist, made the decision to not be as successful as he could have been, but chose what would make him happy. Will in the end decided to give up the job and drive to California to see Skylar.
There were also a lot of relatedness and affiliation and intimacy needs in the movie. Will was an orphan, had been in three different foster homes, and his father beat him. Will is afraid of being abandoned because of these events. Therefore he leaves before others leave him. Will has a lack of relatedness and affiliation and intimacy in this sense. He does not have that warm, closeness, relationship with a parent figure. There is a relatedness with Will and his mates, especially with Chuckie, they are very loyal to each other. Will and his friends go out and have a drink, have fun, work together, and Will's friends bought him a car. There is intimacy with Will and Skylar. They have a boyfriend/girlfriend bond; they went on dates, kissed, and had sex. But the things that Will did not tell Skylar eventually broke that tie. Skylar loved Will, but Will would not tell Skylar he loved her. So she went to California without him. But when Will figured out what he wanted and needed, he went to California to find Skylar to fulfill his need for affiliation and intimacy. Will is not the only one lacking in affiliation and intimacy, Sean is too. Sean's wife died of cancer and misses her. Another scene that stuck out to me was when Will started to go to Sean for sessions, he would not talk for the entire session to prove that he could. So Sean played the same game too and would not start a conversation with him. Eventually Will gave in and started a conversation because of his need for affiliation and to converse.
Throughout the movie, it showed that Will was not very motivated to actually do anything with his genius. He was very competent, he could master any math problem that only a select few could do, but he was not motivated to get a job with his talent. He did the math problems and the therapy sessions because he was extrinsically motivated. If he did not do the math or the therapy sessions he would be back in jail serving time. He did the math problems before he got into trouble because he was intrinsically motivated. Will has a talent and found that doing the math problems on the board was enjoyable.
Will's need for achievement was pretty low. He was a genius, but he did not do anything with it. He worked jobs that did not need smarts like the janitorial job and the construction worker. Will did not learn the need for achievement from socialization, because he did not have a constant parental influence throughout his life. Will did not care if he moved up in the career world because he had Chuckie fill in for him for one of his job interviews. He chose many other things over becoming successful in a career. On the other hand, Gerald Lambeau, the professor, his need for achievement was high. He took any chance he could to get ahead in the career world. Lambeau's need for achievement was proven when it was mentioned many times of the prestigious Fields Medal he won. If he did not have high achievement, he would not have had that award. Lambeau also demonstrated power. He showed power by being a professor at a prestigious school and taking Will under his wing and try to push him to utilize his gift. He also undermined Sean and his decision to not become successful even though he was fully capable. This was obvious when the two of them were fighting in Sean's office and Lambeau was being aggressive. Lambeau wanted to direct Will's future to what he thought was good, while Sean knew this was not what Will wanted.
TERMS: psychological needs, social needs, autonomy, relatedness, affiliation, intimacy, motivation, competence, mastery, extrinsic motivation, intrinsic motivation, achievement, socialization, power

I will go in depth of the concepts of mainly chapter seven in Good Will Hunting. The story line is surrounded around how smart Will is that he proved the math theory. He is intrinsically motivated to work on it. Will is a janitor that worked on the theory on his own time for his own sense of accomplishment. This also ties in with achievement. The bar scene from the beginning displayed the need for power. Will was impacting, in a negative way that the guy trying to prevent Will’s friend from hitting on Skylar was trying to seem smart. Will called him out on it though.
When Will spoke about having dates to Shawn, he was expressing a high need for affiliation. Will seemed like he was trying to prove that he had dates to not get negatively judged. Competence is displayed also, when Will was talking to Skylar at her dorm about going on a second date. He has a low level of competence because he seemed to not know how to handle the situation. Will acted awkward and shy, however he did show up and insisted on a date and fixed it.
Intimacy was shown quite a bit during the movie. Will becomes close to Skylar and Shawn, which he then becomes distant and pushes them away. He has low levels of intimacy mainly, where he forms close relationships with Skylar, but freaks out about going to California with her. She tells him she loves him and he gets cold and replies, “I don’t love you.” At the end of the movie Shawn repeats “it’s not your fault,” which ends up breaking Will down. His level of intimacy increases and he goes to California to find Skylar.

Terms used: intrinsic motivation, achievement, power, affiliation, competence, intimacy

Good will Hunting follows the story of a highly intelligent young man named Will, who hasn’t yet realized his full potential due to his troubled past which seems to be holding him back. With the guidance of his therapist Will and the help of his friends and love interest Will comes into his own and is able to come to terms with his past and discover himself and his needs. The move shows many examples of intrinsic, extrinsic, psychological and social needs.
The movie starts off with professor Lambo putting a complicated math problem on the board for his students to solve. Someone answers the question but no one knows who answered it.The professors write another problem on the board because he is impressed that the person answered the first problem. The professor sees a janitor at MIT writing on the board and yells at him to stop messing up peoples work. Will tells the professor to”fuck off” and runs away. When the professor examines the board he realizes that the janitor (Will) properly answered the question. Will was intrinsically motivated to answer the problem. Will was able to easily find solutions for the difficult math problems, which made it enjoyable for him; it was something he did for fun.
The scene that demonstrated psychological and social needs was the scene in which Skylar and Will are in her bedroom and she ask him to go away with her to California. The scene was very emotional and sad because you could tell Will really did love her but was pushing her away to avoid getting hurt. Will ask Skylar repeatedly how she knows she wants him to go away with her. He says she could find something out next week and he would be left in California by himself. Will tells Skylar he can’t go to California with her because he got a job. She says if you don’t love me tell me he says it’s not that. She rebuts by telling him he lives in a safe little world where no one challenges him. He becomes angry and tells her she just wants to have her fling with the guy from the other side of town. He says she will marry someone who her parents will approve of and she will sit around with all the other trust find babies and talk about the time she was slumming it. She explains her father died when she was 13 and she inherited the money. She says if she could she would rather have one more day with her father then have the money. She then explains to will she knows he’s scared that she won’t love him but she wants to give it a shot. She then she’s honest with him, he says I’m not honest with you and she says you’re not going anywhere he explains to her she doesn’t need to know he was an abused orphan, she explains she only wants to help him. He gets very angry and says he doesn’t need her help. She cries and she says loves him and says that if he tells her he doesn’t love her she won’t call him and she won’t be in his life.
Will feels as if his competence is being threatened when Skylar calls him out and tells him he’s afraid to leave his safe little world. Skylar is frustrating wills need for competence. Failure tolerance is exhibited in this scene as well Will is already premeditating failure in this relationship and thinks that Skylar will leave him, so he wants to leave her, this motivates avoidance behavior. Will is avoiding the situation and doesn’t want to go to California so he can avoid being hurt. Will avoids enviroments with high structure and high failure, this is why he tells Skylar he doesn’t love her. Will wants to have a sense of autonomy hes so scared to be in love and hates feeling that way so the only way he can gain his autonomy back is to say he doesn’t love and remove himself from the situation.
Key terms: intrinsic needs, extrinsic needs, psychological needs, social needs,failure tolerance,avoidance behaviors

Good Will Hunting shows how an emotionally damaged, but extremely intellectual young man fights for autonomy and competence. He also has strong social needs for intimacy though he disguises it well. Every scene of this movie shows how someone’s psychological or social needs are or are not being met. The movie is about the struggle to fill the need deficit.

As will bounces through five different therapists he shows that he is in control and has the freedom to keep his thoughts and feelings to himself. He makes it clear that he has autonomy or freedom in deciding what information he provides and how he gives up or discloses this information. He doesn’t want to trust so he has the freedom not to. He feels seems to act like his competence of the intellectual world and his freedom or autonomy in his decisions is all that he has in his life.

When the professor starts to offer him jobs and try to set everything up for him, he begins to lose a sense of control or choice. His autonomy is threatened and he shows control by sending his best friend to the interview and turning down the professors help. He also tells the professor that he doesn’t want to do the math anymore because it insults his competence. The math is too easy for him and he doesn’t feel like he needs to do it. He shows both his autonomy and competence as he burns the paper that symbolizes an understanding of something that only Will has and his control over what he does with that understanding or intellect.

Also, his interactions with his professor and the jobs that his professor tries to set up for him may show that he has a low-level of achievement. He has no competition for his competence. That is his competence in intellect is rarely challenged (later I will talk about how Skylar challenges his competence in terms of emotionsthat is separate from his intellectual competence). Will is so smart that he doesn’t feel like he needs to work toward achievement. Things just seem to happen for him intellectually. He needs a challenge, competition, a push toward entrepreneurship.

Will being an orphan also has the social needs of affiliation and intimacy. He has the need to affiliate with other as he constantly hangs out with his friends in his free time. He associates with his three buddies and I believe that, without them, he would not be able to function well. He wants to have good relationships with other people; he just simply doesn’t know how to trust because of his past.

His pursuing of Skylar also shows that he (perhaps on a subconscious level) desires to be close to another person or be intimate. He wants to have exchanges with someone based off of how he reacts his therapist when he references his wife. Will does not understand how anyone could care about someone so much. By talking to Shaun he realizes that he wants to have something like what Shaun had with his wife. Will’s desire for intimacy hits clear view when he leaves the note at the end that said, “I have to go see about a girl”. If will didn’t have the need, want, or desire to have exchanges with Skylar or to have intimacy, he would not have gone to California after her.

This need for intimacy is also shown through Shaun. He talks about how he skipped an amazing baseball game to attempt at a possible, intimate relationship. He also tells about how it was the most amazing part of his life to share all of those exchanges with her. He wouldn’t have traded his intimacy with her for the world. Clearly at the point that he went to meet his future wife, he had a very high need for intimacy. Even now that she is dead, he still seems to hold on to his intimacy with her, yet he doesn’t desire to have similar exchanges with anyone else.

Skylar also shows the social need for intimacy. When she gets close to Will she asks him to come with her to California. This is a huge exchange of faith and a big leap of trust in the relationship. She desires to continue their exchanges and build their intimacy. As part of the exchange she needs to have will tell her he loves her and show her feelings in return. Skylar’s asking Will to come to California and tell her that he loves her is a very clear display of her need for intimacy.

In terms of Will’s reaction to Skylar asking him to come he shows that fear. This response is because he has been abandoned in the past which affected his competence in terms of relationships and intimacy. He believes that she will leave him like everyone else and he will enter into a place where he has no autonomy or control over whether or not he’s abandoned.

Will also frequently displays power needs as he challenges all of his therapists to the point of getting them to quit. He also shows power by burning up the math problem that only he can solve. He further displays that he needs power by choosing when to speak and what to speak about. He is completely silent during an entire session with Shaun just to show that he has power. He also is very upset when his power is threatened. That is when he thinks that Skylar is just using him as a fling and a way of showing her power and control. He constantly struggles to satisfy his social need for power.

Will struggles with a low need for achievement and high needs for intimacy, affiliation, and power. He has strong psychological needs for autonomy and competence and throughout the film he demonstrates his efforts toward satisfying all of his needs.

Terms: autonomy, competence, social needs, intimacy, psychological needs, deficit, affiliation, entrepreneur, achievement, challenge/competition, power.

Good Will Hunting

When watching the movie I was looking for the main character, Will, to exhibit the psychological needs and to what degree he seemed to be ruled or influenced by them. The most prevalent psychological need that Will seemed to need was autonomy. He didn’t like to be told what to do or what was right for him. He liked making his own decisions. This was shown throughout the movie over and over. This was shown right off the bat when the professor told him he could get out of jail as long as he went to therapy and did math and Will told the professor no way would he ever go to a shrink. Then when the professor told him this choice was better than sitting in jail and he could choose between the two options he realized that was actually the better option. Another example of his extreme need to be in charge of his life was when the professor and even his best friend told him he needed to do something special with his life. He didn’t like this at all and rebelled a lot during the process of interviewing.

Competence was another psychological need that I looked for. At first I thought that because he was so smart his rating in this need would be very high, however I found it to be somewhat the opposite. Even though he was so smart he didn’t seem to feel the need to show it to anybody in fact he seemed to not really care if his ability got any credit at all. For example when he figured out the math problem on the board the professor posted he never claimed that he was the one who figured it all out. Or when him and his friends went to the Harvard bar he wouldn’t have ever even boasted about his smarts if he wasn’t defending his friend from the other guy. I think that the competence need is still in Will, but I think because he is so smart and knows it he feels no need to express this to anyone. The simple fact of knowing that he is smart is sufficient enough for him.

Relatedness is another need that appears tricky to see in the movie. At first glance at Will’s behavior it seems like he doesn’t want people around doesn’t really care what people think. For instance when all the shrinks are trying to help him he makes jokes about it and we know his past behavior with people was to shut anyone out before they got close. After the movie continued however we saw Will open up. It became clear that he did want to connect with people but he was just too scared to because of how his childhood life panned out. This was very clear in how his relationship with his girlfriend, Skyler, played out. When the feelings became real and she told him she wanted to know the real him and told Will she loved him, he told her he did not love her back. But after the breakthrough with Robin William’s character he ended up giving his good job up to go after her.

I also looked for social needs that would pop up during this film. I saw achievement play a role throughout the movie. The professor thought he had a high level of achievement till he saw how smart Will was and then he mentioned that he couldn’t sleep at night because of how easy it was for Will and how Will was just going to through it all away. Another example was when Skyler would be doing her homework and Will would offer to do it or help and she would say how she wanted to do it because she actually needed to learn it. Once she figured out her homework it probably gave her a sense of achievement.

When watching Will for social needs I looked a lot for affiliation and intimacy. I didn’t really see Will exhibit much affiliation because he didn’t seem to care much what people thought of him. The lack of affiliation or caring what people thought was probably a defense mechanism. Intimacy on the other hand was shown by Will on a couple different relationships. His best friend was a meaningful long term relationship. We also saw how his relationship with Robin Williams and his girlfriend developed into meaningful relationships with the promise of becoming long term.

Power was the last social need I looked for and the character I saw exhibit this the most was the professor. His profession alone sets him up to be high in this need, however how he acted towards Will was in a manner of demonstrating this need. He tried to influence Will all the time on what he should do or where he should get a job.

Terms: psychological needs, autonomy, competence, relatedness, social needs, achievement, affiliation, intimacy, power

The movie Good Will Hunting stars a kid from an iffy neighborhood in Boston who is a super genius. He is a mathematical protégé who is flying under the radar because of his rough past and poor financial situation who is working at a very prestigious school. He is discovered one day proving a very mathematical theorem that no one in the class could. With his ability and his opportunity he could have accomplished many feats amongst Ivy League scholars and other geniuses of the world but he chose not to. Throughout the movie Will is intrinsically motivated to pursue higher education, a girl, and community with his friends.
In this paper I would like to attempt to apply the concepts of intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation throughout the movie. Very early in the movie we see a scene of this. Will is mopping the floors at a prestigious school and stopped early so that he could prove a theorem on the black board that the professor had placed there. He had memorized the problem, took it home, wrote it out and solved it on a mirror in his room. Now it is clear that Will was intrinsically motivated to do this. Intrinsic motivation as defined in class is an inherent desire to engage in one’s interests and to exercise and develop one’s capabilities. We find out as we go through the movie that math comes extremely easily to Will. For him these problems on the blackboard were an optimally challenging task for him to do. He wasn’t paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to go to school; he didn’t have pressure from his parents or professors. Intrinsic motivation tends to increase persistence, creativity, conceptual understanding and optimal functioning of well being. Now Will was certainly demonstrating all of these plusses of intrinsic motivation. These problems required a unique way of thinking that only a few people have the ability to do, which was inspired by Will’s intrinsic motivation. He not only understood the problem in front of him but he understood math as a whole and why things work the way they do. This was all before Professor Gerald Lambeau got a hold of him; that is not to say that Lambeau was all bad for him. I mean, he did bail him out of jail, which was a good thing, but this action unexpectedly put some extrinsic motivators in place for Will to adhere to. For Will, his incentive was to avoid jail time by showing up to do math with Lambeau once a week and to meet with a therapist. People are driven by outside forces including consequences. If Will failed to follow the requirements of his parole he would be sent back to court and possibly to jail. Now extrinsic motivators tend to not have the same positive effects that intrinsic motivation has. At first Will negatively reacted to the therapy and was willing to do the math, which he even found entertaining. However, his areas of interest quickly shifted because of outside factors. He was no longer enjoying tackling math problems because they came to easily to him, even though they were impossible to almost everyone else around him, he had attained an extreme level of competence that even led to boredom. Math and knowledge in general now failed to meet his psychological needs. At the same time as math was going out the window relationships were coming through the back door.
His therapist, Sean Maguire, was the first to bring to Will’s attention how little he actually knew about life. When in the park he exposed this weakness by acknowledging that Will was a genius and could scientifically/logically explain almost anything, from art to string theory, but what will lacked was life experience relating to anything. Maguire said that Will may even have been laid before but he didn’t know love, openness, or intimacy. This is understandably so when we learned about Will’s past foster home experience which included severe abuse. Will’s first chance to experience intimacy is with a girl named Skylar. They hit it off at first, both being smart, attractive, and enjoying each other’s company. But when the relationship started to get serious Will freaked out, and pursued a performance-avoidance goal, in that he was afraid of what might happen if things didn’t work out with Skylar, just like every other relationship he had experienced, and that motivated him to forcibly end the relationship. However, after first establishing a strong relationship with Sean he realized that he could do the same with Skylar and he desperately craved that intimacy. What he craved was a deep emotional connection with someone that he deeply cared about who cared equally as much about him…intimacy, not affiliation. I think Will would say screw affiliation; he just wants Skylar and Sean. The extrinsic rewards, promise, and achievements that waited for Will in the math world were not enough to motivate him to stay. In the end he was intrinsically motivated to pursue his social need for intimacy which was with Skylar in California.
Terms: intrinsic motivation, optimally challenging, persistence, conceptual understanding, optimal well being, extrinsic motivators, incentive, consequences, psychological needs, intimacy, avoidance behavior, performance-avoidance goal, motivation, affiliation

“Good Will Hunting” was a wonderful movie that demonstrated motivation and needs very well. One good example of motivation was Professor Gerald Lambeau. Lambeau was intrinsically motivated. He was a man who would seek out and master optimal challenges. The challenge of obtaining a doctorate and becoming a professor were a couple of those challenges. Because of his love for math and the career path he chose, he was able to fulfill needs for autonomy by being able to do his own math research and competency by having the opportunity to use creativity and deeper understandings to develop in a way that is conceptual and not just about memorization. At his job some relationships in his life were good; however his need for relatedness was not always fulfilled. Lambeau had a one track mind that was unwilling to see an alternate way once his mind was decided. This was seen when Lambeau and his friend Sean Maguire were discussing Hunting’s future. Maguire wanted what was best for Hunting, but Lambeau was unable to see past what he wanted for Hunting. The man in the bar with the long hair was a great example of someone who is extrinsically motivated. Upon being humiliated by Hunting, he precedes to use the comeback of “at least I will have a degree.” This makes it clear that he is more motivated by awards, privileges, and public recognition that he is of actually developing his own ideas and conceptual understandings.

Landeau and Maguire demonstrated two different styles of motivation when it came to Hunting’s future. Landeau, on one end, had a controlling motivating style. He tried to pressure Hunting towards the path that he felt Hunting should take. On the other hand Maguire motivated Hunting through an autonomy-supportive style. He did this by asking Hunting what he wants to do, allowing Hunting time to talk, and acknowledging his perspective. Of the two people, Maguire made the biggest positive impact on Hunting, and allowed for him to grow as a person.

There were many displays of people’s need for relatedness in the movie. Some of the main examples include Hunting’s friends and him which were very close and relied on each other. Whether it be for a car ride or for someone to have their back in a fight they were in it together. Hunting’s friends were only one example of the psychological need for relatedness that Hunting experienced. He also developed a close emotional bond and attachment with Skylar in which they accepted and valued each other. The same could be said for Hunting and Maguire. Maguire was a very intelligent man who challenged Hunting. Hunting grew to appreciate and respect Maguire, and eventually they became friends. One of the strongest examples of relatedness was between Hunting and Chuckie Sullivan. These two individuals honestly cared for each other and wanted the best for each other. Sullivan demonstrated this when he told Hunting that his dream would always be that when he goes to pick him up for work, one day he wouldn’t be there anymore. Sullivan wanted what’s best for Hunting, even if it meant he had to lose his best friend. Once social bonds are formed, it can be very hard for people to break them. This shows how much Sullivan cared for Hunting. He wanted the best for Hunting, even if it was bad for Sullivan.
Hunting was a complicated character with great qualities including his intelligence and personality. He had a rough beginning in life being sent to different foster homes. Through his life he developed a tendency to avoid failure. There were many ways he demonstrated this. One example is that, while he was a genius, he still chose jobs that required no thought. This allowed a way for others to not have many expectations for him, and this ensured he would never actually fail on anything that mattered to him. He also demonstrated fears of rejection by always pushing the psychologists away and keeping them from seeing who he really is.
Terms: intrinsically motivated, autonomy, competency, relatedness, extrinsically motivated, conceptual understanding, controlling motivating style, autonomy-supportive style, psychological need, tendency to avoid failure

After watching the movie Good Will Hunting, I was able to relate several scenes to the Motivation and Emotion class. The main characters name is Will and he is a math genius, but from a poor neighborhood. Since he is from a poor neighborhood, his chances for success and being noticed are slim.

The first concept that I recognized in the movie was intrinsic motivation. For Will, he definitely is intrinsically motivated. The job he chose to pursue was being a janitor at a prestigious college. For some it could be aversive to be surrounded by people that have been granted more opportunity by having access to money. However, Will gains recognition after he was observed solving a difficult math problem outside of a math class. This demonstrates intrinsic motivation because he was not actually enrolled in the class, he would not receive credit or a grade for the work he was doing. He was solving the problem to better himself, even if he was not praised for his brilliance. Solving the problem by himself would be enough of a reward. Although Will demonstrated intrinsic motivation, he also showed characteristics of the Atkinson model in the tendency to avoid failure. He obviously was a genius in many ways; however the fear of failure kept him from taking chances. This fear was so strong for him that he eventually shut everyone out of this life that was rooting for him.

Autonomy is also a big part of this scene. Will is aware of his independence and that he is in control of his life. Through this control he demonstrates the choice on whether or not to complete the equation. By choosing to complete it, he is portraying independence that others students have not quite acquired. The other students in class may still have a strong sense of autonomy, but they are being extrinsically motivated by the professor, their parents, fellow classmates, etc. The students are also technically enrolled in the class, so they are extrinsically motivated to do well and pass the class otherwise their money would be wasted.

Competence is another characteristic that Will demonstrates in this scene. Competence is the ability of an individual to perform a job properly. This is often defined by a set of defined behaviors that provide a structured guide enabling the identification, evaluation and development of individuals. Even though he is not recognized as a student and granted the same rewards, he wants to be competent and gain intelligence. He is striving to interact with his surroundings and improving his psychological needs. By improving his psychological needs, he is able to be more well-rounded and happy.

When Skyler invites Will to come to California and they get into a fight and break up demonstrated the concept of affiliation and intimacy. Skyler wanted to take their relationship to the next level and Will was in disbelief. He was worried that she would learn things about him that she didn’t like and this would eventually lead to her dumping him. This fear stemmed from Will’s troubled childhood. After he explained to Skyler why he was so concerned, she attempted to comfort him and say that she would love him no matter what. Will continued to push Skyler away, avoiding intimacy. Sean, Will’s counselor, tries to teach Will that it is okay to let people in and that not all people are bad. Even though Will believed what happened to him was his fault, Sean constantly enforced that it was not. Eventually Sean got through to Will and he started to understand it was not his fault. This ultimately allows Will to start accepting intimate relationships, affiliation and expressing his emotions.

Will demonstrates psychological achievement through the majority of the movie. He has a past that haunts him and he wasn’t able to communicate his pain to groups he was affiliated with and his intimate relationship with Skyler. Although he was brilliant, his psychological needs were not being fulfilled. Will was able to interact with people, but not very effectively. He would come up with witty comebacks and change the subject when something was brought up that he did not want to talk about. As mentioned above, Will begins to listen to Sean and realizes his past was not his fault. By finding the strength to move on and accept what happened, he was able to demonstrate psychological achievement.

Terms: aversive, intrinsic motivation, Atkinson model, tendency to avoid failure, reward, independence, autonomy, extrinsic motivation, competence, psychological needs, striving, affiliation, intimacy, avoiding, enforced, relationships, emotions, psychological achievement, effectively, fulfill

"Good Will Hunting" was the perfect movie to demonstrate many of the psychological needs that we have learned about over the past few chapters. Several scene stuck out in my mind as displaying several of he needs that we went over in class. Many of these needs displayed both motivation and emotion as Will is a math genius, however grew up in a poor neighborhood and doesn't have a good chance at achieving much because of where he comes from.

One of the big social needs that I saw displayed in the movie was intimacy. You can see this displayed in several of Will's relationships. Throughout the movie I think you can see how Will's level of intimacy changes from having low level of intimacy, as a defense mechanism to building more intimacy within his relationships. For example, in Will's relationship with Skylar, Will turns Skylar down as a result of trying not to get hurt, but later he goes to find her in California. You can see through this that Will is coping with different emotions and gains intimacy in his relationship with her as time goes on.

Another social need that Will demonstrates in the movie was relatedness. Like with intimacy, you can see how WIll changes and grows with his needs for relatedness. At first, it appears that Will doesn't care about fitting in and jokes about it with his therapist, however as you watch the movie you can tell that Will actually does want to connect with other people and he in fact does care about having bonding relationships with others.

A huge part of this movie that relates to the chapters is intrinsic motivation. Will was completed motivated to solve the equation by his own motivation and not by any extrinsic motivations. I think this really showed Will's sense of autonomy and independence because he figures it out because he has interest in it and it is challenging for him. He wants to feel a sense of mastery in completing the equation for himself and for self-worth, not to impressed others. Also I think it is important that he chose to figure it out on his own, he did not have encouragement from others to figure it out, so I think that scene is such a great example of intrinsic motivation.

Overall, I think this movie had some really great examples for motivation and emotion and I was surprised at how much I could apply terms and concept from the class to the movie, as other times I have watched it, it was for fun and I didn't really notice all of these needs before.

Terms: psychological needs, motivation, emotion, social needs, intimacy, defense mechanism, relatedness, bonding, intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, autonomy, independence, mastery, self-worth.

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